Conserving Genetic Resources On-Site in Forest Ecosystems. Riggs, L. A. 35(1-2):45–68.
Conserving Genetic Resources On-Site in Forest Ecosystems [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Genetic diversity and its structure (its organization in space and time) are the critical raw materials from which many other aspects of diversity are derived. These genetic resources represent information about unique and successful relationships among genes and between gene complexes and environments. Only a fraction of this information has been mined through research. The balance, and the genetic materials themselves, are most effectively conserved for future use by on-site (in-situ) preservation, management, or restoration of populations, communities and entire landscapes. While we have far to go on the road to understanding biodiversity, research progressing in an array of disciplines offers ample justification to maintain evolved patterns and processes that underlie biodiversity, mediate the efficiency of ecosystem 'services', and influence the availability of genetic raw material for bioresource development, restoration, and use. As biotechnologies advance, we will appreciate more fully the true costs of constructing genetic moieties into fully functional organisms, and maintaining populations of these under controlled conditions or combining them in self-perpetuating systems. Intact populations and ecosystems will be ever more valuable sources of the genetic resources and contextual information required for this enterprise. Three elements are required to realize the values of biodiversity: genetic materials; environments; and information about the functional relationships of the first two. Effective conservation involves uniting these elements. Thorough review of historical, scientific, socioeconomic, and practical information about particular elements of biodiversity is necessary to assess the constraints on and opportunities for conservation activities. The California Gene Resources Program activities from 1980 to 1983 are examples of this kind of undertaking. Computerized information systems can assist managers and researchers in uniting these elements and facilitating both conservation of, and access to, genetic resources. The California Forest Genetic Sources Catalog, a microcomputer database application developed by GENREC for the Wildland Resources Center, is one such application. Well-constructed databases coupled with knowledge-based decision aids will become indispensable as in-situ preserves and managed areas are integrated with ex-situ collections and research findings into effective genetic-resource conservation systems.
@article{riggsConservingGeneticResources1990,
  title = {Conserving Genetic Resources On-Site in Forest Ecosystems},
  author = {Riggs, Lawrence A.},
  date = {1990-06},
  journaltitle = {Forest Ecology and Management},
  volume = {35},
  pages = {45--68},
  issn = {0378-1127},
  doi = {10.1016/0378-1127(90)90231-y},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1016/0378-1127(90)90231-y},
  abstract = {Genetic diversity and its structure (its organization in space and time) are the critical raw materials from which many other aspects of diversity are derived. These genetic resources represent information about unique and successful relationships among genes and between gene complexes and environments. Only a fraction of this information has been mined through research. The balance, and the genetic materials themselves, are most effectively conserved for future use by on-site (in-situ) preservation, management, or restoration of populations, communities and entire landscapes. While we have far to go on the road to understanding biodiversity, research progressing in an array of disciplines offers ample justification to maintain evolved patterns and processes that underlie biodiversity, mediate the efficiency of ecosystem 'services', and influence the availability of genetic raw material for bioresource development, restoration, and use. As biotechnologies advance, we will appreciate more fully the true costs of constructing genetic moieties into fully functional organisms, and maintaining populations of these under controlled conditions or combining them in self-perpetuating systems. Intact populations and ecosystems will be ever more valuable sources of the genetic resources and contextual information required for this enterprise. Three elements are required to realize the values of biodiversity: genetic materials; environments; and information about the functional relationships of the first two. Effective conservation involves uniting these elements. Thorough review of historical, scientific, socioeconomic, and practical information about particular elements of biodiversity is necessary to assess the constraints on and opportunities for conservation activities. The California Gene Resources Program activities from 1980 to 1983 are examples of this kind of undertaking. Computerized information systems can assist managers and researchers in uniting these elements and facilitating both conservation of, and access to, genetic resources. The California Forest Genetic Sources Catalog, a microcomputer database application developed by GENREC for the Wildland Resources Center, is one such application. Well-constructed databases coupled with knowledge-based decision aids will become indispensable as in-situ preserves and managed areas are integrated with ex-situ collections and research findings into effective genetic-resource conservation systems.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13908737,~to-add-doi-URL,biodiversity,conservation,ecosystem-services,forest-resources,genetic-diversity,precursor-research},
  number = {1-2}
}
Downloads: 0