Fitness Attributes of Bacterial and Fungal Seed Endophytes of Tall Fescue. Roberts, E. L., Mormile, B., & Adamchek, C. In Verma, S. K. & White, J. F., editors, Seed Endophytes: Biology and Biotechnology, pages 259–271. Springer International Publishing, Cham, 2019. Citation Key Alias: lens.org/004-523-831-959-190
Fitness Attributes of Bacterial and Fungal Seed Endophytes of Tall Fescue [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Increased fitness in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) is attributed to infection by Epichloë coenophiala. However, plant growth-promoting (PGP) bacteria also increase the fitness of many host plants, and PGP bacteria have been shown to dominate the phyllosphere and rhizosphere microbiome of E. coenophiala-infected (E+) tall fescue. Because E. coenophialum lives endophytically in tall fescue seeds, we hypothesized that PGP bacteria also live within the seeds and could provide fitness advantages to the host. Endophyte-infected (E+) and endophyte-free (E−) Kentucky-31 tall fescue seeds were surface sterilized to remove epiphytic bacteria. Surface sterilized and non-surface sterilized control plants of each type were cultivated for 6 weeks before withholding water to simulate drought. Normal watering was resumed after 4 days. Plant recovery of each group was measured by assigning a numerical value to tillers based on the state of decline. Surface-sterilized E+ plants were unable to recover as efficiently as E+ controls but outperformed both E− groups. Additionally, total 16S amplified DNA extracted from each seed type was analyzed with Illumina sequencing to assess the internal microbial communities from E+ and E− seeds as well as the seed coat microbiome. E+ seeds have lower diversity of endophytic bacterial species and are dominated by Pseudomonadaceae. Further, several of the seed endophytes are PGP bacterial strains.
@incollection{roberts_fitness_2019,
	address = {Cham},
	title = {Fitness {Attributes} of {Bacterial} and {Fungal} {Seed} {Endophytes} of {Tall} {Fescue}},
	isbn = {978-3-030-10504-4},
	url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-10504-4_13},
	abstract = {Increased fitness in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) is attributed to infection by Epichloë coenophiala. However, plant growth-promoting (PGP) bacteria also increase the fitness of many host plants, and PGP bacteria have been shown to dominate the phyllosphere and rhizosphere microbiome of E. coenophiala-infected (E+) tall fescue. Because E. coenophialum lives endophytically in tall fescue seeds, we hypothesized that PGP bacteria also live within the seeds and could provide fitness advantages to the host. Endophyte-infected (E+) and endophyte-free (E−) Kentucky-31 tall fescue seeds were surface sterilized to remove epiphytic bacteria. Surface sterilized and non-surface sterilized control plants of each type were cultivated for 6 weeks before withholding water to simulate drought. Normal watering was resumed after 4 days. Plant recovery of each group was measured by assigning a numerical value to tillers based on the state of decline. Surface-sterilized E+ plants were unable to recover as efficiently as E+ controls but outperformed both E− groups. Additionally, total 16S amplified DNA extracted from each seed type was analyzed with Illumina sequencing to assess the internal microbial communities from E+ and E− seeds as well as the seed coat microbiome. E+ seeds have lower diversity of endophytic bacterial species and are dominated by Pseudomonadaceae. Further, several of the seed endophytes are PGP bacterial strains.},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2019-11-18},
	booktitle = {Seed {Endophytes}: {Biology} and {Biotechnology}},
	publisher = {Springer International Publishing},
	author = {Roberts, Elizabeth Lewis and Mormile, Brendan and Adamchek, Christopher},
	editor = {Verma, Satish Kumar and White, James Francis, Jr},
	year = {2019},
	doi = {10.1007/978-3-030-10504-4_13},
	note = {Citation Key Alias: lens.org/004-523-831-959-190},
	keywords = {Clavicipitaceae, Epichloë coenophialum, Epichloë spp., Plant growth promotion, Plant growth-promoting bacteria, Stress tolerance, Tall fescue, dept.bio},
	pages = {259--271}
}

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