Fisheries co-management in a new era of marine policy in the UK: A preliminary assessment of stakeholder perceptions. Rodwell, L. D., Lowther, J., Hunter, C., & Mangi, S. C. Marine Policy.
Fisheries co-management in a new era of marine policy in the UK: A preliminary assessment of stakeholder perceptions [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Abstract Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authorities (IFCAs) were established in England after the Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009 became operational in April 2011. The IFCAs represent a co-management system which prioritises both conservation and fisheries objectives and broadens the interest groups involved in regulatory decision-making in inshore fisheries. The establishment of the IFCAs is intended to facilitate a true ecosystem approach to marine management, contribute to a more contemporary, open and inclusive governance model and move towards the ultimate goal of sustainable fisheries. The aim of this paper is to give a preliminary assessment of the perceptions of IFCA members of their role in relation to a number of IFCA criteria. Forty IFCA members responded to an online questionnaire. Four IFCA Chief Officers then commented on members' views in a second questionnaire. Findings suggest that despite the diversity of views of members the IFCA goals are commonly agreed. ‘Conservation of marine ecosystems for (direct) economic purposes’ and ‘Sustaining and improving fisheries productivity’ are given as the top two priorities receiving 77.5% and 67.5% of the possible vote respectively. ‘Ensuring effective fisheries enforcement’ and ‘conservation of marine ecosystems for non-economic purposes’ followed jointly receiving 47.5% of possible vote. There is a wide concern amongst members, however, that the resources of the IFCA are inadequate to meet all goals. Managing members' expectations will be essential in early years of the IFCAs in order that realistic management objectives can be met. Members identified a need for improved communication and education regarding both fisheries and environmental issues to ensure better informed decision making. IFCAs appear to have many of the attributes needed for successful co-management though continued monitoring of IFCA performance is required. The paper reflects on the wider global context, noting that improving fisheries sustainability to any significant degree requires concerted effort in regional policy making.
@article{rodwell_fisheries_????,
	title = {Fisheries co-management in a new era of marine policy in the {UK}: {A} preliminary assessment of stakeholder perceptions},
	issn = {0308-597X},
	shorttitle = {Fisheries co-management in a new era of marine policy in the {UK}},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X13002054},
	doi = {10.1016/j.marpol.2013.09.008},
	abstract = {Abstract
Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authorities (IFCAs) were established in England after the Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009 became operational in April 2011. The IFCAs represent a co-management system which prioritises both conservation and fisheries objectives and broadens the interest groups involved in regulatory decision-making in inshore fisheries. The establishment of the IFCAs is intended to facilitate a true ecosystem approach to marine management, contribute to a more contemporary, open and inclusive governance model and move towards the ultimate goal of sustainable fisheries. The aim of this paper is to give a preliminary assessment of the perceptions of IFCA members of their role in relation to a number of IFCA criteria. Forty IFCA members responded to an online questionnaire. Four IFCA Chief Officers then commented on members' views in a second questionnaire. Findings suggest that despite the diversity of views of members the IFCA goals are commonly agreed. ‘Conservation of marine ecosystems for (direct) economic purposes’ and ‘Sustaining and improving fisheries productivity’ are given as the top two priorities receiving 77.5\% and 67.5\% of the possible vote respectively. ‘Ensuring effective fisheries enforcement’ and ‘conservation of marine ecosystems for non-economic purposes’ followed jointly receiving 47.5\% of possible vote. There is a wide concern amongst members, however, that the resources of the IFCA are inadequate to meet all goals. Managing members' expectations will be essential in early years of the IFCAs in order that realistic management objectives can be met. Members identified a need for improved communication and education regarding both fisheries and environmental issues to ensure better informed decision making. IFCAs appear to have many of the attributes needed for successful co-management though continued monitoring of IFCA performance is required. The paper reflects on the wider global context, noting that improving fisheries sustainability to any significant degree requires concerted effort in regional policy making.},
	urldate = {2013-10-07},
	journal = {Marine Policy},
	author = {Rodwell, Lynda D. and Lowther, Jason and Hunter, Charlotte and Mangi, Stephen C.},
	keywords = {Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authorities, Sustainable development},
	file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:files/47571/Rodwell et al. - Fisheries co-management in a new era of marine pol.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:files/47518/S0308597X13002054.html:text/html;ScienceDirect Snapshot:files/47566/S0308597X13002054.html:text/html}
}
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