Capital Breeding in a Diapausing Copepod: A Transcriptomics Analysis. Roncalli, V., Cieslak, M., C., Hopcroft, R., R., & Lenz, P., H. Frontiers in Marine Science, 7:56, Frontiers, 3, 2020.
Capital Breeding in a Diapausing Copepod: A Transcriptomics Analysis [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Capital breeders must balance the energetic requirements of cellular function and the cost of reproduction in organisms. The subarctic copepod Neocalanus flemingeri, a small planktonic crustacean, depends on a short annual phytoplankton bloom to acquire the energy needed to support a non-feeding female adult that enters a period of diapause prior to spawning five to seven months later. After emergence from diapause, the reproductive program takes two-months starting with germline development. The relationships between energy utilization, cellular maintenance and oogenesis were investigated through gene expression profiling. The sequential up- and down-regulation of genes involved in cellular maintenance and metabolic pathways coincided with four developmental groups: diapause, emergence from diapause and early oogenesis, mid to late oogenesis, and finally spawning and end-of-life. Up-regulation of genes involved in cellular homeostasis, glycolysis and lipid catabolism as well as germline development characterized the transition from diapause to post-diapause. The down-regulation of genes involved in cellular homeostasis coincided with the up-regulation of genes related to mid-late oogenesis and protein degradation. As females started to spawn, genes involved in protein ubiquitination and programmed cell death became up-regulated. Energy allocation and utilization is highly dynamic in N. flemingeri during the non-feeding period and it is linked to the provisioning and maturation of eggs through lipid catabolism and autophagy. The data suggest the presence of a mechanism that regulates fecundity to match the availability of stored resources. Such a mechanism would minimize reproductive failure when resources and contribute to the resilience of the species.
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 title = {Capital Breeding in a Diapausing Copepod: A Transcriptomics Analysis},
 type = {article},
 year = {2020},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Energy resources,Gene Expression,Neocalanus flemingeri,Oogenesis,RNA-Seq},
 pages = {56},
 volume = {7},
 websites = {https://www.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmars.2020.00056/full},
 month = {3},
 publisher = {Frontiers},
 day = {6},
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 abstract = {Capital breeders must balance the energetic requirements of cellular function and the cost of reproduction in organisms. The subarctic copepod Neocalanus flemingeri, a small planktonic crustacean, depends on a short annual phytoplankton bloom to acquire the energy needed to support a non-feeding female adult that enters a period of diapause prior to spawning five to seven months later. After emergence from diapause, the reproductive program takes two-months starting with germline development. The relationships between energy utilization, cellular maintenance and oogenesis were investigated through gene expression profiling. The sequential up- and down-regulation of genes involved in cellular maintenance and metabolic pathways coincided with four developmental groups: diapause, emergence from diapause and early oogenesis, mid to late oogenesis, and finally spawning and end-of-life. Up-regulation of genes involved in cellular homeostasis, glycolysis and lipid catabolism as well as germline development characterized the transition from diapause to post-diapause. The down-regulation of genes involved in cellular homeostasis coincided with the up-regulation of genes related to mid-late oogenesis and protein degradation. As females started to spawn, genes involved in protein ubiquitination and programmed cell death became up-regulated. Energy allocation and utilization is highly dynamic in N. flemingeri during the non-feeding period and it is linked to the provisioning and maturation of eggs through lipid catabolism and autophagy. The data suggest the presence of a mechanism that regulates fecundity to match the availability of stored resources. Such a mechanism would minimize reproductive failure when resources and contribute to the resilience of the species.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Roncalli, Vittoria and Cieslak, Matthew C. and Hopcroft, Russell R. and Lenz, Petra H.},
 journal = {Frontiers in Marine Science}
}

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