Virtual XML: A Toolbox and Use Cases for the XML World View. Rose, K. H.; Malaika, S.; and Schloss, R. J. IBM Systems Journal, 45(2):411-424, 2006.
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Although the Extensible Markup Language (XML) has gained in popularity and has resulted in the creation of powerful software for authoring, transforming, and querying XML-based business data, much information remains in non-XML form. In this paper we introduce an approach to virtualize data resources and thus enable applications to access both XML and non-XML sources. We describe the architectural components that enable virtual XML --- a toolbox that includes a cursor model, an XML-view mechanism such as the view created with the Data Format Description Language (DFDL), and XML processing languages. We illustrate the applicability of virtual XML through a number of use cases in various environments. We discuss the products that we expect from vendors and the open-source community and the way enterprises can plan to take advantage of virtual XML developments. Finally, we outline future research directions that include a vision of virtual XML that covers large-scale structures such as entire file systems, databases, or even the World Wide Web.
@article{ ros06,
  author = {Kristoffer H. Rose and Susan Malaika and Robert J. Schloss},
  title = {Virtual XML: A Toolbox and Use Cases for the XML World View},
  journal = {IBM Systems Journal},
  year = {2006},
  volume = {45},
  number = {2},
  pages = {411-424},
  doi = {10.1147/sj.452.0411},
  uri = {http://www.research.ibm.com/journal/sj/452/rose.html},
  uri = {http://www.research.ibm.com/journal/sj/452/rose.pdf},
  abstract = {Although the Extensible Markup Language (XML) has gained in popularity and has resulted in the creation of powerful software for authoring, transforming, and querying XML-based business data, much information remains in non-XML form. In this paper we introduce an approach to virtualize data resources and thus enable applications to access both XML and non-XML sources. We describe the architectural components that enable virtual XML --- a toolbox that includes a cursor model, an XML-view mechanism such as the view created with the Data Format Description Language (DFDL), and XML processing languages. We illustrate the applicability of virtual XML through a number of use cases in various environments. We discuss the products that we expect from vendors and the open-source community and the way enterprises can plan to take advantage of virtual XML developments. Finally, we outline future research directions that include a vision of virtual XML that covers large-scale structures such as entire file systems, databases, or even the World Wide Web.}
}
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