Fireproof killer whales ( Orcinus orca ): flame-retardant chemicals and the conservation imperative in the charismatic icon of British Columbia, Canada. Ross, P. S Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 63(1):224--234, January, 2006.
Fireproof killer whales ( Orcinus orca ): flame-retardant chemicals and the conservation imperative in the charismatic icon of British Columbia, Canada [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Long-lived and high trophic level marine mammals are vulnerable to accumulating often very high concentrations of persistent chemicals, including pesticides, industrial by-products, and flame retardants. In the case of killer whales (Orcinus orca), some of the older individuals currently frequenting the coastal waters of British Columbia (BC) were born during the First World War, well before the advent of widespread chemical manufacture and use. BC's killer whales are now among the most polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contaminated marine mammals in the world. While the "legacy" PCBs have largely been banned, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have recently emerged as a major concern. The endocrine-disrupting nature of these two persistent fire retardants in biota spells trouble at the top of the food chain, with increasing evidence of effects on reproductive health, the immune system, and development in exposed mammals. The heavy contamination of BC's killer whales, coupled with their long life span an...
@article{ross_fireproof_2006,
	title = {Fireproof killer whales ( {Orcinus} orca ): flame-retardant chemicals and the conservation imperative in the charismatic icon of {British} {Columbia}, {Canada}},
	volume = {63},
	issn = {0706-652X},
	url = {http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/f05-244},
	doi = {10.1139/f05-244},
	abstract = {Long-lived and high trophic level marine mammals are vulnerable to accumulating often very high concentrations of persistent chemicals, including pesticides, industrial by-products, and flame retardants. In the case of killer whales (Orcinus orca), some of the older individuals currently frequenting the coastal waters of British Columbia (BC) were born during the First World War, well before the advent of widespread chemical manufacture and use. BC's killer whales are now among the most polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contaminated marine mammals in the world. While the "legacy" PCBs have largely been banned, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have recently emerged as a major concern. The endocrine-disrupting nature of these two persistent fire retardants in biota spells trouble at the top of the food chain, with increasing evidence of effects on reproductive health, the immune system, and development in exposed mammals. The heavy contamination of BC's killer whales, coupled with their long life span an...},
	language = {en},
	number = {1},
	journal = {Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences},
	author = {Ross, Peter S},
	month = jan,
	year = {2006},
	keywords = {Flame retardants, unsure},
	pages = {224--234}
}
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