Effects of Drought and Heat on Forest Insect Populations in Relation to the 2003 Drought in Western Europe. Rouault, G., Candau, J., Lieutier, F., Nageleisen, L., Martin, J., & Warzée, N. 63(6):613–624.
Effects of Drought and Heat on Forest Insect Populations in Relation to the 2003 Drought in Western Europe [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Although drought affects directly tree physiology and growth, the impact of secondary factors (insect pests, pathogens and fire) is often greater than the impact of the original stress and can lead to important tree mortality. In 2003, Western and Central Europe experienced a drought and heat waves that led to extensive forest damage. This paper reports on the impacts of drought and high temperatures on forest insect populations in the context of this exceptional event. Observations of changes in population levels of the main European forest insect pests during and after the drought are presented and discussed in the light of current knowledge and theories of interactions between drought and insects. We investigated the direct effects of drought on life history traits and indirect effects through physiological changes experienced by host trees. Forest pest insects were separated in 4 feeding guilds: woodborers, leaf-chewers, leaf-miners and leaf-suckers. The impact of water stress varied according to feeding guilds. Woodborers were positively influenced by prolonged water stress and the decline of host resistance. In contrast, defoliators profited better from the increased nitrogen in plant tissues linked to moderate or intermittent water stress. Field observations showed the importance of the soil water status in tree resistance against pest attacks. Thus, the 2003 drought confirmed observations from earlier droughts that, is case of bad choice of tree species in some plantations, site matching becomes a prominent and primary cause of the development of pest outbreaks. This exceptional drought may give us some indication of the impacts of extreme climatic events. However, observations of the performance at the individual level were not sufficient for predicting long-term insect population dynamics, which depends on complex interactions between biotic and abiotic factors.
@article{rouaultEffectsDroughtHeat2006,
  title = {Effects of Drought and Heat on Forest Insect Populations in Relation to the 2003 Drought in {{Western Europe}}},
  author = {Rouault, Gaëlle and Candau, Jean-Noël and Lieutier, François and Nageleisen, Louis-Michel and Martin, Jean-Claude and Warzée, Nathalie},
  date = {2006-09},
  journaltitle = {Annals of Forest Science},
  volume = {63},
  pages = {613--624},
  issn = {1286-4560},
  doi = {10.1051/forest:2006044},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1051/forest:2006044},
  abstract = {Although drought affects directly tree physiology and growth, the impact of secondary factors (insect pests, pathogens and fire) is often greater than the impact of the original stress and can lead to important tree mortality. In 2003, Western and Central Europe experienced a drought and heat waves that led to extensive forest damage. This paper reports on the impacts of drought and high temperatures on forest insect populations in the context of this exceptional event. Observations of changes in population levels of the main European forest insect pests during and after the drought are presented and discussed in the light of current knowledge and theories of interactions between drought and insects. We investigated the direct effects of drought on life history traits and indirect effects through physiological changes experienced by host trees. Forest pest insects were separated in 4 feeding guilds: woodborers, leaf-chewers, leaf-miners and leaf-suckers. The impact of water stress varied according to feeding guilds. Woodborers were positively influenced by prolonged water stress and the decline of host resistance. In contrast, defoliators profited better from the increased nitrogen in plant tissues linked to moderate or intermittent water stress. Field observations showed the importance of the soil water status in tree resistance against pest attacks. Thus, the 2003 drought confirmed observations from earlier droughts that, is case of bad choice of tree species in some plantations, site matching becomes a prominent and primary cause of the development of pest outbreaks. This exceptional drought may give us some indication of the impacts of extreme climatic events. However, observations of the performance at the individual level were not sufficient for predicting long-term insect population dynamics, which depends on complex interactions between biotic and abiotic factors.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13364455,droughts,elatobium-abietinum,europe,forest-pests,forest-resources,ips-typographus,lymantria-dispar,operophtera-brumata,phloemyzus-passerinii,phyllaphis-fagi,pissodes-piceae,pityogenes-chalcographus,pityokteines-curvidens,thaumetopoea-pityocampa,tortrix-viridana,zeiraphera-diniana},
  number = {6}
}
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