Effects of Multigrade Classes on Student Progress in Literacy and Numeracy: Quantitative Evidence and Perceptions of Teachers and School Leaders. Russell, V. J.; Rowe, K. J.; and Hill, P. W. November, 1998.
Effects of Multigrade Classes on Student Progress in Literacy and Numeracy: Quantitative Evidence and Perceptions of Teachers and School Leaders. [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
On the basis of a comprehensive best-evidence synthesis of the literature on the effects of multigrade and multi-age classes, Veenman (1995) concluded that there were no significant differences between multigrade and single-grade classes in cognitive or achievement effects. Subsequently, Mason and Burns (1996) challenged Veenman's conclusion, claiming that multigrade classes have at least a small negative effect on achievement, as well as having potential negative effects on teacher motivation. Multigrade classes are used extensively within Victorian primary schools, sometimes by choice but at other times as a result of the combined pressures from staff-student ratios and enrollment numbers at particular grade levels. The issue of their contribution to effective learning is thus a critical, practical one, as well as an interesting research question. Analysis of data from the Victorian Quality Schools Project, a large, comprehensive, three-year, longitudinal study of school and
@article{russell_effects_1998,
	title = {Effects of {Multigrade} {Classes} on {Student} {Progress} in {Literacy} and {Numeracy}: {Quantitative} {Evidence} and {Perceptions} of {Teachers} and {School} {Leaders}.},
	shorttitle = {Effects of {Multigrade} {Classes} on {Student} {Progress} in {Literacy} and {Numeracy}},
	url = {http://eric.ed.gov/?q=multiage&pg=26&id=ED444122},
	abstract = {On the basis of a comprehensive best-evidence synthesis of the literature on the effects of multigrade and multi-age classes, Veenman (1995) concluded that there were no significant differences between multigrade and single-grade classes in cognitive or achievement effects. Subsequently, Mason and Burns (1996) challenged Veenman's conclusion, claiming that multigrade classes have at least a small negative effect on achievement, as well as having potential negative effects on teacher motivation. Multigrade classes are used extensively within Victorian primary schools, sometimes by choice but at other times as a result of the combined pressures from staff-student ratios and enrollment numbers at particular grade levels. The issue of their contribution to effective learning is thus a critical, practical one, as well as an interesting research question. Analysis of data from the Victorian Quality Schools Project, a large, comprehensive, three-year, longitudinal study of school and},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2015-04-08},
	author = {Russell, V. Jean and Rowe, Kenneth J. and Hill, Peter W.},
	month = nov,
	year = {1998}
}
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