Perspectives on Prescribed Burning. Russell-Smith, J. & Thornton, R. 11(s1):e3.
Perspectives on Prescribed Burning [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
[Excerpt] Fire – both natural and anthropogenic – is an inevitable and often essential component of ecosystem processes and landscape management in many parts of the world. The deliberate and accidental use of fire defines us as a species and has helped shape our evolutionary path. Today, the prescribed use of landscape fire is not without controversy and while debates rage in many densely populated fire-prone regional settings, we are also coming to appreciate the global significance of interactions between fire regimes in fire-prone biomes (eg boreal, Mediterranean, and modified tropical forests; savanna woodlands and grasslands) and the Earth–climate system. [] Long-standing debates beset the complex world of prescribed fire management: what is the natural or historical fire regime (ie the combination of frequency, seasonality, intensity, and type of fire) for a region or ecosystem, and what relevance, if any, may that have for contemporary land uses? How do we reconcile often competing management demands for ensuring public safety with maintaining ecosystem services and cultural and biodiversity values? How do we operationally deliver effective fire management in increasingly densely populated, fragmented landscapes and increasingly risk-averse, regulated, and litigious societal settings? How do we know if such practices are delivering against multiple desired objectives? Is there any capacity to be adaptive, especially with changing land-use, climatic, and biotic (eg invasive flammable plants) conditions? [] [...]
@article{russell-smithPerspectivesPrescribedBurning2013,
  title = {Perspectives on Prescribed Burning},
  author = {Russell-Smith, Jeremy and Thornton, Richard},
  date = {2013-08},
  journaltitle = {Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment},
  volume = {11},
  pages = {e3},
  issn = {1540-9295},
  doi = {10.1890/1540-9295-11.s1.e3},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1890/1540-9295-11.s1.e3},
  abstract = {[Excerpt] Fire -- both natural and anthropogenic -- is an inevitable and often essential component of ecosystem processes and landscape management in many parts of the world. The deliberate and accidental use of fire defines us as a species and has helped shape our evolutionary path. Today, the prescribed use of landscape fire is not without controversy and while debates rage in many densely populated fire-prone regional settings, we are also coming to appreciate the global significance of interactions between fire regimes in fire-prone biomes (eg boreal, Mediterranean, and modified tropical forests; savanna woodlands and grasslands) and the Earth–climate system.

[] Long-standing debates beset the complex world of prescribed fire management: what is the natural or historical fire regime (ie the combination of frequency, seasonality, intensity, and type of fire) for a region or ecosystem, and what relevance, if any, may that have for contemporary land uses? How do we reconcile often competing management demands for ensuring public safety with maintaining ecosystem services and cultural and biodiversity values? How do we operationally deliver effective fire management in increasingly densely populated, fragmented landscapes and increasingly risk-averse, regulated, and litigious societal settings? How do we know if such practices are delivering against multiple desired objectives? Is there any capacity to be adaptive, especially with changing land-use, climatic, and biotic (eg invasive flammable plants) conditions?

[] [...]},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-14684489,fire-management,forest-resources,prescribed-burn,science-policy-interface,science-society-interface,trade-offs,vegetation,wildfires},
  number = {s1}
}
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