The securitisation of cultural heritage. Russo, A. & Giusti, S. International Journal of Cultural Policy, 25(7):843–857, November, 2019.
The securitisation of cultural heritage [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
It is not a novelty for art to come under attack: cultural heritage has always been endangered by wars, conflicts and political violence. Since the last century, the international community has started reacting, moved by the concern that these threatened monuments be protected. Lately, cultural heritage can be seen to undergo a veritable crescendo from politicisation to criminalisation and securitisation. Accordingly, this article seeks to analyse the pathway that characterises the international protection of cultural heritage in crisis-torn contexts, employing a discursive lens and mapping the narrative threads that the main international actors have constructed in reaction to recent attacks on archaeological sites (i.e. Palmyra) and historical artefacts, especially in the Middle East (namely Syria and Iraq). After having traced this process, we will offer a tentative explanation of what we consider a process of securitising an under-researched field (i.e. cultural heritage).
@article{russo_securitisation_2019,
	title = {The securitisation of cultural heritage},
	volume = {25},
	issn = {1028-6632, 1477-2833},
	url = {https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10286632.2018.1518979},
	doi = {10.1080/10286632.2018.1518979},
	abstract = {It is not a novelty for art to come under attack: cultural heritage has always been endangered by wars, conflicts and political violence. Since the last century, the international community has started reacting, moved by the concern that these threatened monuments be protected. Lately, cultural heritage can be seen to undergo a veritable crescendo from politicisation to criminalisation and securitisation. Accordingly, this article seeks to analyse the pathway that characterises the international protection of cultural heritage in crisis-torn contexts, employing a discursive lens and mapping the narrative threads that the main international actors have constructed in reaction to recent attacks on archaeological sites (i.e. Palmyra) and historical artefacts, especially in the Middle East (namely Syria and Iraq). After having traced this process, we will offer a tentative explanation of what we consider a process of securitising an under-researched field (i.e. cultural heritage).},
	language = {en},
	number = {7},
	urldate = {2019-11-27},
	journal = {International Journal of Cultural Policy},
	author = {Russo, Alessandra and Giusti, Serena},
	month = nov,
	year = {2019},
	keywords = {cultural heritage, securitisation},
	pages = {843--857}
}

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