The Effects of Adaptation Duration and Interocular Spatial Correlation of the Adaptation Stimulus on the Duration of Motion Aftereffect in Depth. Sakano, Y. & Allison, R. In The Journal of the Vision Society of Japan (The 4th Asian Conference on Vision, Matsue, Shimane, Japan). 2006.
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1. Introduction Theoretically, there are at least two possible binocular cues to motion-in-depth, namely disparity change over time and interocular velocity differences. We previously reported that a motion aftereffect (MAE) in depth occurred after adaptation to motion-in-depth in random-element stereograms that contained interocular velocity differences. Moreover, the duration of MAE in depth following adaptation stimuli without spatially coherent disparities did not differ significantly from that following adaptation to stimuli with coherent disparities (VSS 2005). It is possible that equivalent duration of the MAEs in depth under these two conditions reflects saturation of MAE in depth caused by the long adaptation phase (2 min). In the present study, we test this directly via measurements of the duration of MAE in depth for a variety of adaptation durations. 2. Methods The adaptation stimulus consisted of random-dot stereograms that depicted two frontoparallel planes, one above and one below the fixation point. The two planes repeatedly moved in depth in opposite directions for 7.5 sec, 15 sec, 30 sec, 1 min, 2 min or 4 min. The dots of the adaptation stimulus were spatially and temporally correlated in the two eyes (RDS) or spatially uncorrelated but temporally correlated (URDS). Thus, both RDS and URDS contained the same amount of interocular velocity differences while only RDS had coherent disparity. The test stimulus was a stationary version of the spatially and temporally correlated adaptation stimulus. The subjects pressed a key when the illusory motion-in-depth of the test stimulus (MAE in depth) ceased. 3. Results and discussion Under both RDS and URDS adaptation conditions, a MAE in depth occurred. The duration of the MAE in depth increased as the adaptation duration increased. On the other hand, there was no difference in the duration of the MAE in depth between the RDS and URDS adaptation conditions. These results support the idea that there are mechanisms to see motion-in-depth based on interocular velocity differences, and adaptation to interocular velocity differences, not to changing disparity, is responsible for MAE in depth. Acknowledgement The support of Province of Ontario (Premier's Research Excellence Award) and NSERC (Canada) are greatly appreciated.
@incollection{Sakano:2006gd,
	Abstract = {1. Introduction

Theoretically, there are at least two possible binocular cues to motion-in-depth, namely disparity change over time and interocular velocity differences. We previously reported that a motion aftereffect (MAE) in depth occurred after adaptation to motion-in-depth in random-element stereograms that contained interocular velocity differences. Moreover, the duration of MAE in depth following adaptation stimuli without spatially coherent disparities did not differ significantly from that following adaptation to stimuli with coherent disparities (VSS 2005). It is possible that equivalent duration of the MAEs in depth under these two conditions reflects saturation of MAE in depth caused by the long adaptation phase (2 min). In the present study, we test this directly via measurements of the duration of MAE in depth for a variety of adaptation durations.

2. Methods

The adaptation stimulus consisted of random-dot stereograms that depicted two frontoparallel planes, one above and one below the fixation point. The two planes repeatedly moved in depth in opposite directions for 7.5 sec, 15 sec, 30 sec, 1 min, 2 min or 4 min. The dots of the adaptation stimulus were spatially and temporally correlated in the two eyes (RDS) or spatially uncorrelated but temporally correlated (URDS). Thus, both RDS and URDS contained the same amount of interocular velocity differences while only RDS had coherent disparity. The test stimulus was a stationary version of the spatially and temporally correlated adaptation stimulus. The subjects pressed a key when the illusory motion-in-depth of the test stimulus (MAE in depth) ceased.

3. Results and discussion

Under both RDS and URDS adaptation conditions, a MAE in depth occurred. The duration of the MAE in depth increased as the adaptation duration increased. On the other hand, there was no difference in the duration of the MAE in depth between the RDS and URDS adaptation conditions. These results support the idea that there are mechanisms to see motion-in-depth based on interocular velocity differences, and adaptation to interocular velocity differences, not to changing disparity, is responsible for MAE in depth.

Acknowledgement The support of Province of Ontario (Premier's Research Excellence Award) and NSERC (Canada) are greatly appreciated.},
	Author = {Sakano, Y. and Allison, R.S.},
	Booktitle = {The Journal of the Vision Society of Japan (The 4th Asian Conference on Vision, Matsue, Shimane, Japan)},
	Date-Added = {2011-05-06 16:42:39 -0400},
	Date-Modified = {2013-12-28 15:01:04 +0000},
	Keywords = {Eye Movements & Tracking},
	Title = {The Effects of Adaptation Duration and Interocular Spatial Correlation of the Adaptation Stimulus on the Duration of Motion Aftereffect in Depth},
	Year = {2006}}

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