Exploring the usage of commercial bio-sensors for multitasking detection. Salah, J., Abdelrahman, Y., Abdrabou, Y., Kassem, K., & Abdennadher, S. In ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, 2018.
abstract   bibtex   
Most of the current adaptive systems support single task activities. The rise in the number of daily interactive devices and sources of information made multitasking an integral activity in our daily life. Affect-aware systems show exciting potential to support the user, however, they focus on the induced effect of an additional task in terms of cognitive load and stress, rather than the influence of the number of tasks i.e. multitasking. This paper presents indicators of the number of tasks being performed by the user using a set of bio-sensors. A preliminary user study was conducted with two follow-up explorations. Our findings imply that we can distinguish between the number of tasks performed based on high-end as well as cheap Heart Rate sensors. Additionally, tasks number correlates with other signals, namely wrist and forehead temperature. We provide empirical evidence showing how to differentiate between single- and dual-tasking activities.
@inproceedings{
 title = {Exploring the usage of commercial bio-sensors for multitasking detection},
 type = {inproceedings},
 year = {2018},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Affective Computing,Galvanic Skin Conductance,Heart Rate,Multitasking,Thermal Imaging},
 id = {53585580-99e7-3167-9c02-92140d1f3d45},
 created = {2021-04-16T22:17:58.019Z},
 file_attached = {false},
 profile_id = {c71211e3-ed8a-349e-a8ab-12f9dd12f2a5},
 last_modified = {2021-04-16T22:17:58.019Z},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {true},
 confirmed = {false},
 hidden = {false},
 private_publication = {true},
 abstract = {Most of the current adaptive systems support single task activities. The rise in the number of daily interactive devices and sources of information made multitasking an integral activity in our daily life. Affect-aware systems show exciting potential to support the user, however, they focus on the induced effect of an additional task in terms of cognitive load and stress, rather than the influence of the number of tasks i.e. multitasking. This paper presents indicators of the number of tasks being performed by the user using a set of bio-sensors. A preliminary user study was conducted with two follow-up explorations. Our findings imply that we can distinguish between the number of tasks performed based on high-end as well as cheap Heart Rate sensors. Additionally, tasks number correlates with other signals, namely wrist and forehead temperature. We provide empirical evidence showing how to differentiate between single- and dual-tasking activities.},
 bibtype = {inproceedings},
 author = {Salah, J. and Abdelrahman, Y. and Abdrabou, Y. and Kassem, K. and Abdennadher, S.},
 booktitle = {ACM International Conference Proceeding Series}
}

Downloads: 0