Research in Progress: Development of Giftedness in the Multi-Age, Multi-Ability Primary School. Schack, G. D. February, 1993.
Research in Progress: Development of Giftedness in the Multi-Age, Multi-Ability Primary School. [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
This research examines how a developmentally appropriate educational program in the early years can affect the development of gifted children. The qualitative research specifically focused on a multi-age, multi-ability setting with partial implementation of a whole language program, a systematic writing process and with some flexibility in grouping of students. Eleven teachers and approximately 260 students in an ungraded primary school were involved, with 3 first year and 30 second year students identified as gifted. The study found that gifted children followed a somewhat accelerated curriculum. Teachers felt that there were definite social benefits to integrating the gifted and nongifted students. The multi-age, multi-ability setting seemed to allow young students not identified as gifted to progress more rapidly than they might have in a traditional graded classroom, as they were exposed to higher level instruction. There was little evidence of the development of creative
@article{schack_research_1993,
	title = {Research in {Progress}: {Development} of {Giftedness} in the {Multi}-{Age}, {Multi}-{Ability} {Primary} {School}.},
	shorttitle = {Research in {Progress}},
	url = {http://eric.ed.gov/?q=multiage&pg=26&id=ED357514},
	abstract = {This research examines how a developmentally appropriate educational program in the early years can affect the development of gifted children. The qualitative research specifically focused on a multi-age, multi-ability setting with partial implementation of a whole language program, a systematic writing process and with some flexibility in grouping of students. Eleven teachers and approximately 260 students in an ungraded primary school were involved, with 3 first year and 30 second year students identified as gifted. The study found that gifted children followed a somewhat accelerated curriculum. Teachers felt that there were definite social benefits to integrating the gifted and nongifted students. The multi-age, multi-ability setting seemed to allow young students not identified as gifted to progress more rapidly than they might have in a traditional graded classroom, as they were exposed to higher level instruction. There was little evidence of the development of creative},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2015-04-08},
	author = {Schack, Gina D.},
	month = feb,
	year = {1993}
}
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