Why most developing countries should not try New Zealand's reforms. Schick, A. The World Bank Research Observer, 13:123–131, 1998. 1
Why most developing countries should not try New Zealand's reforms [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Political / Strategic. During the past decade New Zealand has introduced far-reaching reforms in the structure and operation of government departments and agencies. This model has attracted interest in developing countries because it promises significant gains in operational efficiency. But developing countries, which are dominated by informal markets, are risky candidates for applying the New Zealand model. The author suggests that basic reforms to strengthen rule-based government and pave the way for robust markets should be undertaken first.
@article{schick_why_1998,
	title = {Why most developing countries should not try {New} {Zealand}'s reforms},
	volume = {13},
	issn = {0257-3032},
	shorttitle = {Why most developing countries should not try {New} {Zealand}'s reforms},
	url = {http://scholar.google.co.nz/scholar?as_q=&as_epq=Why-most-developing-countries-should-not-try-New-Zealand's-reforms&as_oq=&as_eq=&as_occt=title},
	abstract = {Political / Strategic.  During the past decade New Zealand has introduced far-reaching reforms in the structure and operation of government departments and agencies. This model has attracted interest in developing countries because it promises significant gains in operational efficiency. But developing countries, which are dominated by informal markets, are risky candidates for applying the New Zealand model. The author suggests that basic reforms to strengthen rule-based government and pave the way for robust markets should be undertaken first.},
	journal = {The World Bank Research Observer},
	author = {Schick, Allen},
	year = {1998},
	note = {1},
	keywords = {Academic journals, Hybrid publications, Oceania},
	pages = {123--131},
}

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