Habitat Loss and Fragmentation in Dynamic Landscapes: Avian Perspectives from the Boreal Forest*. Schmiegelow, F. K. A. and Mönkkönen, M. Ecological Applications, 12(2):375--389, April, 2002.
Habitat Loss and Fragmentation in Dynamic Landscapes: Avian Perspectives from the Boreal Forest* [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Although habitat loss and fragmentation are widely regarded as major factors contributing to the decline of many populations, the relative importance of each phenomenon is seldom evaluated. Some researchers have questioned the generality of responses to habitat fragmentation, given variation in life history characteristics, the natural dynamics of systems, and land use patterns. Furthermore, a fundamental mismatch may exist between ecological theory, with its emphasis on the spatial configuration of habitats, and empirical observations of population response. Nevertheless, the paucity of quantitative land management guidelines often leads to inappropriate generalizations of conservation paradigms to regional issues. We reviewed the empirical evidence for true fragmentation effects in boreal bird communities in Fennoscandia and Canada, and concluded that most responses may be attributed to pure habitat loss in landscapes where forest harvesting is the dominant land use practice. In these dynamic landscapes, total forest cover may not change, and predicting patterns of species decline requires identification of the habitats and species of concern. We constructed simple empirical models of benchmark communities in boreal forests of Finland and Canada based on species composition, species abundance distribution, and habitat requirements, in order to identify features of bird species sensitive to the loss of older forests. These models require a solid understanding of the underlying structure of the community of interest, and predict species loss based on a random-sample hypothesis. Our results were consistent with observed patterns of bird population decline and species loss in these regions. This approach provides null models for comparison with habitat remnants in order to test for fragmentation effects, and a basis for more detailed exploration of population dynamics and persistence in these systems. The results of our review and analyses indicated that system- and species-specific considerations are important when assessing the potential outcome of habitat loss and fragmentation on regional biota. Indiscriminate application of conservation paradigms may lead to misguided research efforts and poor management guidelines.
@article{schmiegelow_habitat_2002,
	title = {Habitat {Loss} and {Fragmentation} in {Dynamic} {Landscapes}: {Avian} {Perspectives} from the {Boreal} {Forest}*},
	volume = {12},
	issn = {1939-5582},
	shorttitle = {Habitat {Loss} and {Fragmentation} in {Dynamic} {Landscapes}},
	url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1890/1051-0761(2002)012[0375:HLAFID]2.0.CO;2/abstract},
	doi = {10.1890/1051-0761(2002)012[0375:HLAFID]2.0.CO;2},
	abstract = {Although habitat loss and fragmentation are widely regarded as major factors contributing to the decline of many populations, the relative importance of each phenomenon is seldom evaluated. Some researchers have questioned the generality of responses to habitat fragmentation, given variation in life history characteristics, the natural dynamics of systems, and land use patterns. Furthermore, a fundamental mismatch may exist between ecological theory, with its emphasis on the spatial configuration of habitats, and empirical observations of population response. Nevertheless, the paucity of quantitative land management guidelines often leads to inappropriate generalizations of conservation paradigms to regional issues. We reviewed the empirical evidence for true fragmentation effects in boreal bird communities in Fennoscandia and Canada, and concluded that most responses may be attributed to pure habitat loss in landscapes where forest harvesting is the dominant land use practice. In these dynamic landscapes, total forest cover may not change, and predicting patterns of species decline requires identification of the habitats and species of concern. We constructed simple empirical models of benchmark communities in boreal forests of Finland and Canada based on species composition, species abundance distribution, and habitat requirements, in order to identify features of bird species sensitive to the loss of older forests. These models require a solid understanding of the underlying structure of the community of interest, and predict species loss based on a random-sample hypothesis. Our results were consistent with observed patterns of bird population decline and species loss in these regions. This approach provides null models for comparison with habitat remnants in order to test for fragmentation effects, and a basis for more detailed exploration of population dynamics and persistence in these systems. The results of our review and analyses indicated that system- and species-specific considerations are important when assessing the potential outcome of habitat loss and fragmentation on regional biota. Indiscriminate application of conservation paradigms may lead to misguided research efforts and poor management guidelines.},
	language = {en},
	number = {2},
	urldate = {2018-02-27TZ},
	journal = {Ecological Applications},
	author = {Schmiegelow, Fiona K. A. and Mönkkönen, Mikko},
	month = apr,
	year = {2002},
	keywords = {Canada, Finland, boreal birds, boreal forest, dynamic landscapes, forest harvesting, habitat fragmentation, habitat loss, random sample hypothesis},
	pages = {375--389}
}
Downloads: 0