Contesting patriarchies: Nlha7pamux and Stl'atl'imx women and colonialism in nineteenth-century British Columbia. SCHUURMAN, N. Gender, Place and Culture, 5(2):141–158, 1998.
Contesting patriarchies: Nlha7pamux and Stl'atl'imx women and colonialism in nineteenth-century British Columbia [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
In the second half of the nineteenth century, a number of First Nations (Native) women in the southern interior of British Columbia began to live with and marry white settlers and gold miners. Demographic shifts in both white and Native populations, paired with the precedent of liaisons between fur traders and Native women, contributed to the mobility of Native women. Their departure from indigenous communities was, however, bitterly contested by Native men as well as by white politicians who sought to protect `racial purity’ in the province. Despite opposition, Native women pursued this historically constituted possibility of living within an alternative patriarchy. By the late 1890s, waves of British immigration brought young, single, white women to the province and, in a political climate increasingly hostile to 'miscegenation’ , male settlers began to marry white wives instead. Thus, ironically, discursive and demographic pressures again closed the window through which Native women had travelled into a different culture. Drawing on colonial records and inferences, this article analyses historical components of agency over several generations of Native women. In the process, it examines ways in which relations of power shifted along the axes of race and gender over 30 years of colonialism in British Columbia.
@article{schuurman_contesting_1998,
	series = {North {America}},
	title = {Contesting patriarchies: {Nlha7pamux} and {Stl}'atl'imx women and colonialism in nineteenth-century {British} {Columbia}},
	volume = {5},
	issn = {0966-369X, 1360-0524},
	shorttitle = {Contesting {Patriarchies}},
	url = {http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09663699825250},
	doi = {10.1080/09663699825250},
	abstract = {In the second half of the nineteenth century, a number of First Nations (Native) women in the southern interior of British Columbia began to live with and marry white settlers and gold miners. Demographic shifts in both white and Native populations, paired with the precedent of liaisons between fur traders and Native women, contributed to the mobility of Native women. Their departure from indigenous communities was, however, bitterly contested by Native men as well as by white politicians who sought to protect `racial purity’ in the province. Despite opposition, Native women pursued this historically constituted possibility of living within an alternative patriarchy. By the late 1890s, waves of British immigration brought young, single, white women to the province and, in a political climate increasingly hostile to 'miscegenation’ , male settlers began to marry white wives instead. Thus, ironically, discursive and demographic pressures again closed the window through which Native women had travelled into a different culture. Drawing on colonial records and inferences, this article analyses historical components of agency over several generations of Native women. In the process, it examines ways in which relations of power shifted along the axes of race and gender over 30 years of colonialism in British Columbia.},
	language = {en},
	number = {2},
	urldate = {2021-09-28},
	journal = {Gender, Place and Culture},
	author = {SCHUURMAN, Nadine},
	year = {1998},
	keywords = {Language: English, Region: North America},
	pages = {141--158},
	file = {Schuurman - 1998 - Contesting Patriarchies Nlha7pamux and Stl'atl'im.pdf:/Users/bastien/Zotero/storage/NGZA9EJJ/Schuurman - 1998 - Contesting Patriarchies Nlha7pamux and Stl'atl'im.pdf:application/pdf},
}

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