Automated population of Cyc: extracting information about named-entities from the web. Shah, P., Schneider, D., Matuszek, C., Kahlert, R., C., Aldag, B., Baxter, D., Cabral, J., Witbrock, M., & Curtis, J. In Proceedings of the Nineteenth International FLAIRS Conference, volume 141, pages 153-158, 2006. AAAI Press.
Automated population of Cyc: extracting information about named-entities from the web [pdf]Website  abstract   bibtex   
There is persuasive clinical and experimental evidence that macrophages promote cancer initiation and malignant progression. During tumor initiation, they create an inflammatory environment that is mutagenic and promotes growth. As tumors progress to malignancy, macrophages stimulate angiogenesis, enhance tumor cell migration and invasion, and suppress antitumor immunity. At metastatic sites, macrophages prepare the target tissue for arrival of tumor cells, and then a different subpopulation of macrophages promotes tumor cell extravasation, survival, and subsequent growth. Specialized subpopulations of macrophages may represent important new therapeutic targets.
@inProceedings{
 title = {Automated population of Cyc: extracting information about named-entities from the web},
 type = {inProceedings},
 year = {2006},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 pages = {153-158},
 volume = {141},
 issue = {1},
 websites = {http://www.cyc.com/doc/white_papers/FLAIRS06-AutomatedPopulationOfCyc.pdf},
 publisher = {AAAI Press},
 editors = {[object Object],[object Object]},
 id = {6f83ea73-a632-3089-a42a-6d65d3879b65},
 created = {2012-04-01T16:32:49.000Z},
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 abstract = {There is persuasive clinical and experimental evidence that macrophages promote cancer initiation and malignant progression. During tumor initiation, they create an inflammatory environment that is mutagenic and promotes growth. As tumors progress to malignancy, macrophages stimulate angiogenesis, enhance tumor cell migration and invasion, and suppress antitumor immunity. At metastatic sites, macrophages prepare the target tissue for arrival of tumor cells, and then a different subpopulation of macrophages promotes tumor cell extravasation, survival, and subsequent growth. Specialized subpopulations of macrophages may represent important new therapeutic targets.},
 bibtype = {inProceedings},
 author = {Shah, Purvesh and Schneider, David and Matuszek, Cynthia and Kahlert, Robert C and Aldag, Bjørn and Baxter, David and Cabral, John and Witbrock, Michael and Curtis, Jon},
 booktitle = {Proceedings of the Nineteenth International FLAIRS Conference}
}
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