Large scale physical variability of the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem (BCLME). Shillington, F., Reason, C., Rae, C. D., Florenchie, P., & Penven, P. In The Benguela - Predicting a Large Marine Ecosystem, volume 14, part 2, pages 49--70. , C. Moloney and J. Woods, V.Shannon, G.Hempel, P.Malalnotte-Rizzoli Eds, 2006. OS
Large scale physical variability of the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem (BCLME) [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
INTRODUCTION The Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem (BCLME) is situated off the west coast of Africa between 5-37ºS, 0-26ºE, and spans the three countries of Angola, Namibia and South Africa. It is one of the four major eastern boundary current upwelling systems of the world oceans (Hill et al. 1998), and although it has some similar characteristics to the other eastern boundary upwelling areas, a unique feature is that it is bounded on both the equatorial and poleward extremities by warm water current systems (the tropical warm Angola Current system in the north, and the Indian Ocean western boundary Agulhas Current System in the south; Shannon and Nelson, 1996; Shillington 1998; Shannon and O’Toole 2003). In the region between about 15- 37ºS, the surface currents are generally equatorward, with vigorous coastal upwelling cells, strong and narrow equatorward shelf edge jets (near Cape Town which is situated at 34ºS, 18ºE and off Lüderitz; 28ºS, 15ºE), and a poleward undercurrent along the shelf slope and bottom. The warm tropical Angola Current System (Ajao and Houghton 1998) generally has southward moving coastal currents which meet the Benguela Upwelling System at the Angola-Benguela Frontal Zone (ABFZ) at ~15- 17ºS (Shannon et al. 1987; Field and Shillington 2005; Monteiro and van der Plas, this volume; Veitch et al. 2006). The Angola Current is affected by input from the equatorial wave guide, the South Equatorial Current (SEC) and the South Equatorial Counter Current (SECC) at ~5°S (Peterson and Stramma 1991). Details of the circulation of the Angola Gyre and the nature of the Angola Dome are addressed by Monteiro and van der Plas (this volume), and by Reason et al. (this volume). At the centre of the BCLME region is an area of year-round coastal upwelling, 15- 30°S (Boyer et al. 2000); and a region of seasonal upwelling, 30-34°S. Coastal trapped waves have been observed to propagate polewards on the continental shelf at regular synoptic time scales (~3-10 day periods) from Walvis Bay in Namibia (20°S), and to continue around the Cape of Good Hope and up to 800 km east along the eastern coast of South Africa (Brundrit et al. 1987; Schumann and Brink 1990).
@incollection{ shillington_large_2006,
  title = {Large scale physical variability of the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem ({BCLME})},
  volume = {14, part 2},
  isbn = {9780444527592},
  url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/bookseries/15700461},
  abstract = {{INTRODUCTION}
The Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem ({BCLME}) is situated off the west
coast of Africa between 5-37{ºS}, 0-26{ºE}, and spans the three countries of Angola,
Namibia and South Africa. It is one of the four major eastern boundary current
upwelling systems of the world oceans (Hill et al. 1998), and although it has some
similar characteristics to the other eastern boundary upwelling areas, a unique feature
is that it is bounded on both the equatorial and poleward extremities by warm water
current systems (the tropical warm Angola Current system in the north, and the Indian
Ocean western boundary Agulhas Current System in the south; Shannon and Nelson,
1996; Shillington 1998; Shannon and O’Toole 2003). In the region between about 15-
37{ºS}, the surface currents are generally equatorward, with vigorous coastal upwelling
cells, strong and narrow equatorward shelf edge jets (near Cape Town which is
situated at 34{ºS}, 18{ºE} and off Lüderitz; 28{ºS}, 15{ºE}), and a poleward undercurrent
along the shelf slope and bottom. The warm tropical Angola Current System (Ajao and
Houghton 1998) generally has southward moving coastal currents which meet the
Benguela Upwelling System at the Angola-Benguela Frontal Zone ({ABFZ}) at {~}15-
17{ºS} (Shannon et al. 1987; Field and Shillington 2005; Monteiro and van der Plas, this
volume; Veitch et al. 2006).
The Angola Current is affected by input from the equatorial wave guide, the South
Equatorial Current ({SEC}) and the South Equatorial Counter Current ({SECC}) at {~}5°S
(Peterson and Stramma 1991). Details of the circulation of the Angola Gyre and the
nature of the Angola Dome are addressed by Monteiro and van der Plas (this volume),
and by Reason et al. (this volume).
At the centre of the {BCLME} region is an area of year-round coastal upwelling, 15-
30°S (Boyer et al. 2000); and a region of seasonal upwelling, 30-34°S. Coastal
trapped waves have been observed to propagate polewards on the continental shelf at
regular synoptic time scales ({~}3-10 day periods) from Walvis Bay in Namibia (20°S),
and to continue around the Cape of Good Hope and up to 800 km east along the
eastern coast of South Africa (Brundrit et al. 1987; Schumann and Brink 1990).},
  language = {Eng},
  booktitle = {The Benguela - Predicting a Large Marine Ecosystem},
  publisher = {, C. Moloney and J. Woods, V.Shannon, G.Hempel, P.Malalnotte-Rizzoli  Eds},
  author = {Shillington, F.A. and Reason, C.J.C. and Duncombe Rae, C.M. and Florenchie, P. and Penven, P.},
  year = {2006},
  note = {{OS}},
  pages = {49--70}
}
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