Involvement of quinones and phenoloxidase in the allorejection reaction in a colonial ascidian, Botrylloides simodensis: histochemical and immunohistochemical study. Shirae, M.; Ballarin, L.; Frizzo, A.; Saito, Y.; and Hirose, E. Marine Biology, 141(4):659–665, October, 2002.
Involvement of quinones and phenoloxidase in the allorejection reaction in a colonial ascidian, Botrylloides simodensis: histochemical and immunohistochemical study [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
When incompatible colonies of Botrylloides simodensis were brought into contact at their artificially cut surfaces, allorejection occurred and a black line was formed along the contact border. Morula cells (MCs), a type of hemocytes, are the major effector in the allorejection reaction and are known to possess phenoloxidase (PO) that generates quinones. In this rejection reaction, MCs infiltrate the tunic and break down, discharging their vacuolar contents. Ascorbic acid (antioxidant) and benzamidine (protease inhibitor) showed inhibitory effects on MC breakdown, black line formation and new tunic cuticle formation, whereas tropolone (metal chelator) and sodium benzoate (substrate analog) did not. MCs probably store some amount of quinones, as well as PO; oxidants derived from the quinones appear to disintegrate the tissue to form a black line and promote MC breakdown. Histochemical and immunohistochemical studies revealed that MCs contain eosinophilic materials, PO and quinones. Quinones that are stored in MCs and produced by PO probably have a destructive function, forming rejection lesions.
@article{shirae_involvement_2002,
	title = {Involvement of quinones and phenoloxidase in the allorejection reaction in a colonial ascidian, {Botrylloides} simodensis: histochemical and immunohistochemical study},
	volume = {141},
	issn = {1432-1793},
	shorttitle = {Involvement of quinones and phenoloxidase in the allorejection reaction in a colonial ascidian, {Botrylloides} simodensis},
	url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s00227-002-0855-0},
	doi = {10.1007/s00227-002-0855-0},
	abstract = {When incompatible colonies of Botrylloides simodensis were brought into contact at their artificially cut surfaces, allorejection occurred and a black line was formed along the contact border. Morula cells (MCs), a type of hemocytes, are the major effector in the allorejection reaction and are known to possess phenoloxidase (PO) that generates quinones. In this rejection reaction, MCs infiltrate the tunic and break down, discharging their vacuolar contents. Ascorbic acid (antioxidant) and benzamidine (protease inhibitor) showed inhibitory effects on MC breakdown, black line formation and new tunic cuticle formation, whereas tropolone (metal chelator) and sodium benzoate (substrate analog) did not. MCs probably store some amount of quinones, as well as PO; oxidants derived from the quinones appear to disintegrate the tissue to form a black line and promote MC breakdown. Histochemical and immunohistochemical studies revealed that MCs contain eosinophilic materials, PO and quinones. Quinones that are stored in MCs and produced by PO probably have a destructive function, forming rejection lesions.},
	language = {en},
	number = {4},
	urldate = {2020-03-04},
	journal = {Marine Biology},
	author = {Shirae, M. and Ballarin, L. and Frizzo, A. and Saito, Y. and Hirose, E.},
	month = oct,
	year = {2002},
	keywords = {Saito Y},
	pages = {659--665}
}
Downloads: 0