Validation of a Pavement Response Model Using Full-scale Field Tests. Siddharthan, R. V.; Krishnamenon, N.; El-Mously, M.; and Sebaaly, P. E. International Journal of Pavement Engineering, 3(2):85–93, January, 2002. Publisher: Taylor & Francis _eprint: https://doi.org/10.1080/10298430290030595
Validation of a Pavement Response Model Using Full-scale Field Tests [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
This paper provides details on a field verification program undertaken to validate the applicability of a finite-layer mechanistic model that has been selected to perform pavement response calculations. The proposed pavement response model is more realistic since it can handle moving traffic loading conditions, and it takes into consideration important factors such as vehicle speed and the non-uniform stress distributions (normal and shear) at the tire-pavement interface. Typically in pavement studies, the strain responses are required only at a few selected locations and for such problems the proposed approach is ideally suited. The applicability of the finite-layer approach and the ensuing computer program 3D-Moving Load Analysis (3D-MOVE) has been verified using two well-documented full-scale field tests (Penn State University test track and Minnesota road tests). As many as thirty eight measured strain responses were compared with those computed by 3D-MOVE and the comparison is very good. The computed impact of vehicle speed on the tensile strain at the bottom of the AC layer is consistent with those measured in both the field tests. Many mechanistic pavement response models are deficient since they do not incorporate the influence of vehicle speed and the complex tire-pavement contact stress distribution.
@article{siddharthan_validation_2002,
	title = {Validation of a {Pavement} {Response} {Model} {Using} {Full}-scale {Field} {Tests}},
	volume = {3},
	issn = {1029-8436},
	url = {https://doi.org/10.1080/10298430290030595},
	doi = {10.1080/10298430290030595},
	abstract = {This paper provides details on a field verification program undertaken to validate the applicability of a finite-layer mechanistic model that has been selected to perform pavement response calculations. The proposed pavement response model is more realistic since it can handle moving traffic loading conditions, and it takes into consideration important factors such as vehicle speed and the non-uniform stress distributions (normal and shear) at the tire-pavement interface. Typically in pavement studies, the strain responses are required only at a few selected locations and for such problems the proposed approach is ideally suited. The applicability of the finite-layer approach and the ensuing computer program 3D-Moving Load Analysis (3D-MOVE) has been verified using two well-documented full-scale field tests (Penn State University test track and Minnesota road tests). As many as thirty eight measured strain responses were compared with those computed by 3D-MOVE and the comparison is very good. The computed impact of vehicle speed on the tensile strain at the bottom of the AC layer is consistent with those measured in both the field tests. Many mechanistic pavement response models are deficient since they do not incorporate the influence of vehicle speed and the complex tire-pavement contact stress distribution.},
	number = {2},
	urldate = {2020-06-30},
	journal = {International Journal of Pavement Engineering},
	author = {Siddharthan, Raj V. and Krishnamenon, N. and El-Mously, Mohey and Sebaaly, Peter E.},
	month = jan,
	year = {2002},
	note = {Publisher: Taylor \& Francis
\_eprint: https://doi.org/10.1080/10298430290030595},
	keywords = {Complex Interface Stress Distributions, Finite-layer Method, Pavement Strain Response, Vehicle Speed, Viscoelastic Characterization},
	pages = {85--93}
}
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