Classic zinc finger from friend of GATA mediates an interaction with the coiled-coil of transforming acidic coiled-coil 3. Simpson, R., J., Lee, S., H., Y., Bartle, N., Sum, E., Y., Visvader, J., E., Matthews, J., M., Mackay, J., P., & Crossley, M. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 279(38):39789-39797, 2004.
Classic zinc finger from friend of GATA mediates an interaction with the coiled-coil of transforming acidic coiled-coil 3 [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Classic zinc finger domains (cZFs) consist of a β-hairpin followed by an α-helix. They are among the most abundant of all protein domains and are often found in tandem arrays in DNA-binding proteins, with each finger contributing an α-helix to effect sequence-specific DNA recognition. Lone cZFs, not found in tandem arrays, have been postulated to function in protein interactions. We have studied the transcriptional co-regulator Friend of GATA (FOG), which contains nine zinc fingers. We have discovered that the third cZF of FOG contacts a coiled-coil domain in the centrosomal protein transforming acidic coiled-coil 3 (TACC3). Although FOG-ZF3 exhibited low solubility, we have used a combination of mutational mapping and protein engineering to generate a derivative that was suitable for in vitro and structural analysis. We report that the α-helix of FOG-ZF3 recognizes a C-terminal portion of the TACC3 coiled-coil. Remarkably, the α-helical surface utilized by FOG-ZF3 is the same surface responsible for the well established sequence-specific DNA-binding properties of many other cZFs. Our data demonstrate the versatility of cZFs and have implications for the analysis of many as yet uncharacterized cZF proteins.
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 title = {Classic zinc finger from friend of GATA mediates an interaction with the coiled-coil of transforming acidic coiled-coil 3},
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 year = {2004},
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 pages = {39789-39797},
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 abstract = {Classic zinc finger domains (cZFs) consist of a β-hairpin followed by an α-helix. They are among the most abundant of all protein domains and are often found in tandem arrays in DNA-binding proteins, with each finger contributing an α-helix to effect sequence-specific DNA recognition. Lone cZFs, not found in tandem arrays, have been postulated to function in protein interactions. We have studied the transcriptional co-regulator Friend of GATA (FOG), which contains nine zinc fingers. We have discovered that the third cZF of FOG contacts a coiled-coil domain in the centrosomal protein transforming acidic coiled-coil 3 (TACC3). Although FOG-ZF3 exhibited low solubility, we have used a combination of mutational mapping and protein engineering to generate a derivative that was suitable for in vitro and structural analysis. We report that the α-helix of FOG-ZF3 recognizes a C-terminal portion of the TACC3 coiled-coil. Remarkably, the α-helical surface utilized by FOG-ZF3 is the same surface responsible for the well established sequence-specific DNA-binding properties of many other cZFs. Our data demonstrate the versatility of cZFs and have implications for the analysis of many as yet uncharacterized cZF proteins.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Simpson, Raina J.Y. and Lee, Stella Hoi Yi and Bartle, Natalie and Sum, Eleanor Y. and Visvader, Jane E. and Matthews, Jacqueline M. and Mackay, Joel P. and Crossley, Merlin},
 journal = {Journal of Biological Chemistry},
 number = {38}
}

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