Extraction of temporal information in functional MRI. Singh, M. and Sungkarat, W. IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, 49(5):2284-2290, 2002.
Extraction of temporal information in functional MRI [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
The temporal resolution of functional MRI (fMRI) is limited by the shape of the haemodynamic response function (hrf) and the vascular architecture underlying the activated regions. Typically, the temporal resolution of fMRI is on the order of 1 s. We have developed a new data processing approach to extract temporal information on a pixel-by-pixel basis at the level of 100 ms from fMRI data. Instead of correlating or fitting the time-course of each pixel to a single reference function, which is the common practice in fMRI, we correlate each pixel's time-course to a series of reference functions that are shifted with respect to each other by 100 ms. The reference function yielding the highest correlation coefficient for a pixel is then used as a time marker for that pixel. A Monte Carlo simulation and experimental study of this approach were performed to estimate the temporal resolution as a function of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the time-course of a pixel. Assuming a known and stationary hrf, the simulation and experimental studies suggest a lower limit in the temporal resolution of approximately 100 ms at an SNR of 3. The multireference function approach was also applied to extract timing information from an event-related motor movement study where the subjects flexed a finger on cue. The event was repeated 19 times with the event's presentation staggered to yield an approximately 100-ms temporal sampling of the haemodynamic response over the entire presentation cycle. The timing differences among different regions of the brain activated by the motor task were clearly visualized and quantified by this method. The results suggest that it is possible to achieve a temporal resolution of ∼200 ms in practice with this approach.
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 title = {Extraction of temporal information in functional MRI},
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 abstract = {The temporal resolution of functional MRI (fMRI) is limited by the shape of the haemodynamic response function (hrf) and the vascular architecture underlying the activated regions. Typically, the temporal resolution of fMRI is on the order of 1 s. We have developed a new data processing approach to extract temporal information on a pixel-by-pixel basis at the level of 100 ms from fMRI data. Instead of correlating or fitting the time-course of each pixel to a single reference function, which is the common practice in fMRI, we correlate each pixel's time-course to a series of reference functions that are shifted with respect to each other by 100 ms. The reference function yielding the highest correlation coefficient for a pixel is then used as a time marker for that pixel. A Monte Carlo simulation and experimental study of this approach were performed to estimate the temporal resolution as a function of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the time-course of a pixel. Assuming a known and stationary hrf, the simulation and experimental studies suggest a lower limit in the temporal resolution of approximately 100 ms at an SNR of 3. The multireference function approach was also applied to extract timing information from an event-related motor movement study where the subjects flexed a finger on cue. The event was repeated 19 times with the event's presentation staggered to yield an approximately 100-ms temporal sampling of the haemodynamic response over the entire presentation cycle. The timing differences among different regions of the brain activated by the motor task were clearly visualized and quantified by this method. The results suggest that it is possible to achieve a temporal resolution of ∼200 ms in practice with this approach.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Singh, M and Sungkarat, W},
 journal = {IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science},
 number = {5}
}
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