Choice, Diversity and 'Exit' in Schooling: A Mixed Picture. Sliwka, A. & Istance, D. European Journal of Education, 41(1):45–58, 2006.
Choice, Diversity and 'Exit' in Schooling: A Mixed Picture [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Traditionally, most systems have required that parents send their children to a school within the district of residence and close to the family home, sometimes with an elite private system co‐existing alongside. In recent years, this basic model has been modified, with some countries witnessing more extensive changes than others. This article outlines the range of change that has taken place along the dual axes of promoting diversity and establishing room for the exercise of parental choice. The synthesis article draws on the material submitted by all the countries participating in the OECD study, and not only those which feature specifically in this issue. The first section reviews the current situation regarding parental choice of school and evidence relating to how that choice is exercised by different groups of parents. For choice to be exercised, there must be alternatives to choose from, and hence there follows a review of some of the policies and practices for diversity. The article then examines diversity in more forms contrasting selective and non‐selective schools, public and private schools, and formal and home schooling. Several countries have moved to greater diversification of public education, allowing for different types of schools accommodating different student ability levels or parents’ educational preferences. The role of demand is clearly a central element in their emergence and differing fortunes. This in turn is closely, but not exclusively, related to the familiar factors of social advantage and reproduction as well as to issues of value choices and beliefs.
@article{sliwka_choice_2006,
	title = {Choice, {Diversity} and '{Exit}' in {Schooling}: {A} {Mixed} {Picture}},
	volume = {41},
	issn = {0141-8211},
	url = {https://sci-hub.st/10.1111/j.1465-3435.2006.00245.x},
	doi = {10.1111/j.1465-3435.2006.00245.x},
	abstract = {Traditionally, most systems have required that parents send their children to a school within the district of residence and close to the family home, sometimes with an elite private system co‐existing alongside. In recent years, this basic model has been modified, with some countries witnessing more extensive changes than others. This article outlines the range of change that has taken place along the dual axes of promoting diversity and establishing room for the exercise of parental choice. The synthesis article draws on the material submitted by all the countries participating in the OECD study, and not only those which feature specifically in this issue. The first section reviews the current situation regarding parental choice of school and evidence relating to how that choice is exercised by different groups of parents. For choice to be exercised, there must be alternatives to choose from, and hence there follows a review of some of the policies and practices for diversity. The article then examines diversity in more forms contrasting selective and non‐selective schools, public and private schools, and formal and home schooling. Several countries have moved to greater diversification of public education, allowing for different types of schools accommodating different student ability levels or parents’ educational preferences. The role of demand is clearly a central element in their emergence and differing fortunes. This in turn is closely, but not exclusively, related to the familiar factors of social advantage and reproduction as well as to issues of value choices and beliefs.},
	language = {eng},
	number = {1},
	journal = {European Journal of Education},
	author = {Sliwka, Anne and Istance, David},
	year = {2006},
	pages = {45--58}
}
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