Reconceptualizing the British State: Theoretical and Empirical Challenges to Central Government. Smith, M. J Public Administration, 76(1):45--72, December, 2002.
Reconceptualizing the British State: Theoretical and Empirical Challenges to Central Government [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Britain is generally perceived as having a hierarchical and unified political system with power concentrated in the central institutions of the state. This conception has not only influenced analysis but has affected the behaviour of politicians. However, in recent years both conceptions of the state and, how it operates, have been challenged. Conventional approaches concerned with the internal workings of the state have largely taken the nature of power as unproblematic. Consequently they have oversimplified the nature of power relationships within the state. In the last five or ten years the dominant conceptions of the core state have been questioned by theoretical and empirical challenges such as globalization, the core executive, the reform of government, bureau-shaping and new approaches to power. The article analyses how these challenges require a reconceptualization of the central British state.
@article{smith_reconceptualizing_2002,
	title = {Reconceptualizing the {British} {State}: {Theoretical} and {Empirical} {Challenges} to {Central} {Government}},
	volume = {76},
	issn = {1467-9299},
	shorttitle = {Reconceptualizing the {British} {State}},
	url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-9299.00090/abstract},
	doi = {10.1111/1467-9299.00090},
	abstract = {Britain is generally perceived as having a hierarchical and unified political system with power concentrated in the central institutions of the state. This conception has not only influenced analysis but has affected the behaviour of politicians. However, in recent years both conceptions of the state and, how it operates, have been challenged. Conventional approaches concerned with the internal workings of the state have largely taken the nature of power as unproblematic. Consequently they have oversimplified the nature of power relationships within the state. In the last five or ten years the dominant conceptions of the core state have been questioned by theoretical and empirical challenges such as globalization, the core executive, the reform of government, bureau-shaping and new approaches to power. The article analyses how these challenges require a reconceptualization of the central British state.},
	language = {en},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2012-05-03},
	journal = {Public Administration},
	author = {Smith, Martin J},
	month = dec,
	year = {2002},
	pages = {45--72}
}
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