Changes in the Activity of a CPG Neuron After the Reinforcement of an Operantly Conditioned Behavior in Lymnaea. Spencer, G. E.; Kazmi, M. H.; Syed, N. I.; and Lukowiak, K. Journal of Neurophysiology, 88(4):1915–1923, journals.physiology.org, oct, 2002.
Changes in the Activity of a CPG Neuron After the Reinforcement of an Operantly Conditioned Behavior in Lymnaea [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
We have previously shown that the aerial respiratory behavior of the mollusk Lymnaea stagnalis can be operantly conditioned, and the central pattern generating (CPG) neurons underlying this behavior have been identified. As neural correlates of operant conditioning remain poorly defined in both vertebrates and invertebrates, we have used the Lymnaea respiratory CPG to investigate neuronal changes associated with the change in behavior after conditioning. After operant conditioning of the intact animals, semi-intact preparations were dissected, so that changes in the respiratory behavior (pneumostome openings) and underlying activity of the identified CPG neuron, right pedal dorsal 1 (RPeD1), could be monitored simultaneously. RPeD1 was studied because it initiates the rhythmic activity of the CPG and receives chemo-sensory input from the pneumostome area. Pneumostome openings and RPeD1 activity were monitored both before and after a reinforcing training stimulus applied to the open pneumostome of operantly conditioned and yoked control preparations. After presentation of the reinforcing stimulus, there was a significant reduction in both breathing behavior and RPeD1 activity in operant preparations but not in yoked and naı̈ve controls. Furthermore these changes were only significant in the subgroup of operantly conditioned animals described as good learners and not in poor learners. These data strongly suggest that changes in RPeD1 activity may underlie the behavioral changes associated with the reinforcement of operant conditioning of the respiratory behavior.
@article{pop00059,
abstract = {We have previously shown that the aerial respiratory behavior of the mollusk Lymnaea stagnalis can be operantly conditioned, and the central pattern generating (CPG) neurons underlying this behavior have been identified. As neural correlates of operant conditioning remain poorly defined in both vertebrates and invertebrates, we have used the Lymnaea respiratory CPG to investigate neuronal changes associated with the change in behavior after conditioning. After operant conditioning of the intact animals, semi-intact preparations were dissected, so that changes in the respiratory behavior (pneumostome openings) and underlying activity of the identified CPG neuron, right pedal dorsal 1 (RPeD1), could be monitored simultaneously. RPeD1 was studied because it initiates the rhythmic activity of the CPG and receives chemo-sensory input from the pneumostome area. Pneumostome openings and RPeD1 activity were monitored both before and after a reinforcing training stimulus applied to the open pneumostome of operantly conditioned and yoked control preparations. After presentation of the reinforcing stimulus, there was a significant reduction in both breathing behavior and RPeD1 activity in operant preparations but not in yoked and naı̈ve controls. Furthermore these changes were only significant in the subgroup of operantly conditioned animals described as good learners and not in poor learners. These data strongly suggest that changes in RPeD1 activity may underlie the behavioral changes associated with the reinforcement of operant conditioning of the respiratory behavior.},
annote = {Query date: 2020-06-29 13:05:30},
author = {Spencer, Gaynor E. and Kazmi, Mustapha H. and Syed, Naweed I. and Lukowiak, Ken},
doi = {10.1152/jn.2002.88.4.1915},
issn = {0022-3077},
journal = {Journal of Neurophysiology},
month = {oct},
number = {4},
pages = {1915--1923},
pmid = {12364517},
publisher = {journals.physiology.org},
title = {{Changes in the Activity of a CPG Neuron After the Reinforcement of an Operantly Conditioned Behavior in Lymnaea}},
url = {https://journals.physiology.org/doi/abs/10.1152/jn.2002.88.4.1915 https://www.physiology.org/doi/10.1152/jn.2002.88.4.1915},
volume = {88},
year = {2002}
}
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