The effects of expert musical training on the perception of emotions in Bach’s Sonata for Unaccompanied Violin No. 1 in G Minor (BWV 1001). Spitzer, M. & Coutinho, E. Psychomusicology: Music, Mind, and Brain, 24(1):35-57, 2014.
The effects of expert musical training on the perception of emotions in Bach’s Sonata for Unaccompanied Violin No. 1 in G Minor (BWV 1001). [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
: The focus of this article is the relationship between musical emotion, as expressed by the composer and perceived by the listener, and the structural features of a work of art-music. First, we analyzed a work by J. S. Bach for solo violin (Sonata for Unaccompanied Violin, No. 1 in G Minor, BWV 1001), from the standpoint of how its structural features were associated with the expression of different emotional categories from the perspective of the composer and through the eyes and ears of the music analyst. We then constructed 2 empirical experiments to test whether contemporary listeners could identify the same emotions identified by the analysis, targeted at 2 groups of subjects: relatively inexperienced popular music students; and musicians, composers, and music academics (including some of the world's leading Bach scholars). Our results suggest that-emotional attributions by low-level experts are led by surface acoustic features; those by high-expert listeners are led by both acoustic and formal features; that this applied much more to the emotions of Sadness and Tenderness rather than to Anger or Fear; and that despite the common confusion between Anger and Fear in real life, listeners were capable of differentiating these emotions in the music supporting analytical findings in the score., (C) 2014 by the American Psychological Association
@article{
 title = {The effects of expert musical training on the perception of emotions in Bach’s Sonata for Unaccompanied Violin No. 1 in G Minor (BWV 1001).},
 type = {article},
 year = {2014},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {article,journal},
 pages = {35-57},
 volume = {24},
 websites = {http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/pmu0000036},
 id = {441486d4-3671-36e5-be8e-b13c2909e431},
 created = {2020-05-29T11:51:38.590Z},
 accessed = {2014-04-22},
 file_attached = {false},
 profile_id = {ffa9027c-806a-3827-93a1-02c42eb146a1},
 last_modified = {2020-06-08T17:31:54.615Z},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {true},
 confirmed = {true},
 hidden = {false},
 citation_key = {spitzer2014the1001},
 source_type = {article},
 folder_uuids = {116db2f1-e6ac-4780-bccf-a977325250cd,99880aa7-55df-4b45-bfce-0ffc00b23ced,ba331422-1c6a-4d1c-a682-9282f58b3182},
 private_publication = {false},
 abstract = {: The focus of this article is the relationship between musical emotion, as expressed by the composer and perceived by the listener, and the structural features of a work of art-music. First, we analyzed a work by J. S. Bach for solo violin (Sonata for Unaccompanied Violin, No. 1 in G Minor, BWV 1001), from the standpoint of how its structural features were associated with the expression of different emotional categories from the perspective of the composer and through the eyes and ears of the music analyst. We then constructed 2 empirical experiments to test whether contemporary listeners could identify the same emotions identified by the analysis, targeted at 2 groups of subjects: relatively inexperienced popular music students; and musicians, composers, and music academics (including some of the world's leading Bach scholars). Our results suggest that-emotional attributions by low-level experts are led by surface acoustic features; those by high-expert listeners are led by both acoustic and formal features; that this applied much more to the emotions of Sadness and Tenderness rather than to Anger or Fear; and that despite the common confusion between Anger and Fear in real life, listeners were capable of differentiating these emotions in the music supporting analytical findings in the score., (C) 2014 by the American Psychological Association},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Spitzer, Michael and Coutinho, Eduardo},
 journal = {Psychomusicology: Music, Mind, and Brain},
 number = {1}
}

Downloads: 0