Evaluation of recurrent pediatric syncope: role of tilt table testing. Strieper, M.; Auld, D.; Hulse, J.; and Campbell, R. Pediatrics, 93(4):660–662, April, 1994.
Evaluation of recurrent pediatric syncope: role of tilt table testing. [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
OBJECTIVE: To determine the current practice and effectiveness of evaluating recurrent syncope in pediatric patients, and to establish the role of tilt table testing in the evaluation. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of 54 pediatric patients with the history of syncope referred to cardiologists. Group I consisted of 27 patients examined without tilt table testing; group II consisted of 27 patients whose examination included tilt table testing. RESULTS: Group I had an average of 5.4 studies and group II, 6.6 studies performed per patient. Studies included chest radiograph (16 vs 13), electrocardiogram (24 vs 27), echocardiography (21 vs 27), 24-hour electrocardiogram (14 vs 16), transtelephonic monitor (7 vs 8), electrophysiology study (1 vs 3), complete blood cell counts (11 vs 12), chemistries (10 vs 11), thyroid function test (3 vs 3), neurology consult (12 vs 6), electroencephalogram (12 vs 5), and head computed tomographic scan (5 vs 3). Of the 298 non-tilt studies, the results of only 5 (1.6%) were abnormal. Diagnoses were made in 5 (18.5%) of 27 group I patients (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, 1; conversion reaction, 2; hyperventilation, 1; migraines, 1), whereas diagnosis was made in 27 (100%) of 27 group II patients (neurocardiogenic syncope, 25; conversion reaction, 2). CONCLUSION: An extensive workup is not routinely indicated in syncopal patients with a history consistent with neurocardiogenic syncope. Tilt table testing performed early in the evaluation will increase the probability of a diagnosis, and will often prevent the need for further extensive, expensive anxiety-producing tests.
@article{strieper_evaluation_1994,
	title = {Evaluation of recurrent pediatric syncope: role of tilt table testing.},
	volume = {93},
	issn = {0031-4005},
	url = {https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8134225},
	abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To determine the current practice and effectiveness of evaluating recurrent syncope in pediatric patients, and to establish the role of tilt table testing in the evaluation. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of 54 pediatric patients with the history of syncope referred to cardiologists. Group I consisted of 27 patients examined without tilt table testing; group II consisted of 27 patients whose examination included tilt table testing. RESULTS: Group I had an average of 5.4 studies and group II, 6.6 studies performed per patient. Studies included chest radiograph (16 vs 13), electrocardiogram (24 vs 27), echocardiography (21 vs 27), 24-hour electrocardiogram (14 vs 16), transtelephonic monitor (7 vs 8), electrophysiology study (1 vs 3), complete blood cell counts (11 vs 12), chemistries (10 vs 11), thyroid function test (3 vs 3), neurology consult (12 vs 6), electroencephalogram (12 vs 5), and head computed tomographic scan (5 vs 3). Of the 298 non-tilt studies, the results of only 5 (1.6\%) were abnormal. Diagnoses were made in 5 (18.5\%) of 27 group I patients (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, 1; conversion reaction, 2; hyperventilation, 1; migraines, 1), whereas diagnosis was made in 27 (100\%) of 27 group II patients (neurocardiogenic syncope, 25; conversion reaction, 2). CONCLUSION: An extensive workup is not routinely indicated in syncopal patients with a history consistent with neurocardiogenic syncope. Tilt table testing performed early in the evaluation will increase the probability of a diagnosis, and will often prevent the need for further extensive, expensive anxiety-producing tests.},
	language = {eng},
	number = {4},
	journal = {Pediatrics},
	author = {Strieper, MJ and Auld, DO and Hulse, JE and Campbell, RM},
	month = apr,
	year = {1994},
	keywords = {Vagus Nerve},
	pages = {660--662}
}
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