Citizens’ perceptions of the courts: The impact of race, gender, and recent experience. Sun, I. Y. & Wu, Y. Journal of Criminal Justice, 34(5):457--467, September, 2006.
Citizens’ perceptions of the courts: The impact of race, gender, and recent experience [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
This study examined the influences of race, gender, and recent court experience on citizens’ perceptions of the courts in their communities. Using national survey data collected in 2000, this research assessed variation in perceptions of the courts along four dimensions: differential treatment, fair procedure and outcome, concern and respect, and overall evaluation. The results showed that racial minorities, including Blacks and Latinos, were more likely than Whites to have negative attitudes toward the courts. While race is generally a better predictor than gender, the interaction between gender and race is important in understanding citizen’s perceptions of the courts. Citizens who have recent personal contact with the courts tend to rate the courts less favorable than those who have no recent contact. Citizens’ opinions of the police and equal opportunity are also significantly related to their perceptions of the courts. Implications for policy and future research are discussed.
@article{sun_citizens_2006,
	title = {Citizens’ perceptions of the courts: {The} impact of race, gender, and recent experience},
	volume = {34},
	issn = {0047-2352},
	shorttitle = {Citizens’ perceptions of the courts},
	url = {https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0047235206000778},
	doi = {10.1016/j.jcrimjus.2006.09.001},
	abstract = {This study examined the influences of race, gender, and recent court experience on citizens’ perceptions of the courts in their communities. Using national survey data collected in 2000, this research assessed variation in perceptions of the courts along four dimensions: differential treatment, fair procedure and outcome, concern and respect, and overall evaluation. The results showed that racial minorities, including Blacks and Latinos, were more likely than Whites to have negative attitudes toward the courts. While race is generally a better predictor than gender, the interaction between gender and race is important in understanding citizen’s perceptions of the courts. Citizens who have recent personal contact with the courts tend to rate the courts less favorable than those who have no recent contact. Citizens’ opinions of the police and equal opportunity are also significantly related to their perceptions of the courts. Implications for policy and future research are discussed.},
	number = {5},
	urldate = {2017-02-01TZ},
	journal = {Journal of Criminal Justice},
	author = {Sun, Ivan Y. and Wu, Yuning},
	month = sep,
	year = {2006},
	keywords = {Citizen perception of courts, Court experience, Gender differences, Public opinion, Racial differences},
	pages = {457--467}
}

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