Memory. Sutton, J. In The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, pages 122–128. Macmillan Reference, 2 edition, 2006.
abstract   bibtex   
[first paragraph] Remembering is one of the most characteristic and most puzzling of human activities. In particular, personal memory—the ability mentally to travel back into the past, as leading psychologist Endel Tulving puts it—often has intense emotional or moral significance: It is perhaps the most striking manifestation of the peculiar way human beings are embedded in time, and of humans' limited but genuine freedom from their present environ- ment and immediate needs.Memory has been significant in the history of philosophy as much in relation to ethics and to epistemology as in theories of psyche, mind, and self.
@incollection{Sutton2006b,
abstract = {[first paragraph] Remembering is one of the most characteristic and most puzzling of human activities. In particular, personal memory—the ability mentally to travel back into the past, as leading psychologist Endel Tulving puts it—often has intense emotional or moral significance: It is perhaps the most striking manifestation of the peculiar way human beings are embedded in time, and of humans' limited but genuine freedom from their present environ- ment and immediate needs.Memory has been significant in the history of philosophy as much in relation to ethics and to epistemology as in theories of psyche, mind, and self.},
author = {Sutton, John},
booktitle = {The Encyclopedia of Philosophy},
edition = {2},
editor = {Borchert, Donald},
file = {:Users/michaelk/Library/Application Support/Mendeley Desktop/Downloaded/Sutton - 2006 - Memory.pdf:pdf},
pages = {122--128},
publisher = {Macmillan Reference},
title = {{Memory}},
year = {2006}
}
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