PBDEs and PBDD/Fs in house and office dust from Japan. Suzuki, G, Nose, K, Takigami, H, Takahashi, S, & Sakai, S. Organohalogen Compounds, 68:1843--1846, 2006.
PBDEs and PBDD/Fs in house and office dust from Japan. [pdf]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
In order to reduce the accidental fire, brominated flame retardants (BFRs) such as PBDEs are added to plastics, polyurethane foams, and textiles for household materials. The rapid decrease in PBDE consumption after 1990 could be due to the industry's voluntary phasing out of PBDEs in Japan because of global concern regarding their potential adverse environmental and health effects and their thermal-breakdown products.1 However, lots of products such as TV and computer have contained PBDEs used in the past, which may be sources of them in the indoor air.2 Previous studies have indicated that PBDEs accumulate through food chain and are potential toxic compounds for human, suggesting that the control strategy for them contained in products is very important. Recently, the analysis of PBDEs in house dust has been conducted all over the world, indicating that PBDE concentrations of house dust are relatively higher than other media such as sediment. 3-6 Many researchers also demonstrated the importance of house dust as the routes of human exposure to PBDEs. On the other hand, there is no systematic monitoring investigation for grasping PBDEs level of dust in Japan. In this study, we investigated the PBDE concentrations in dust derived from household and office in Japan. PBDD/Fs, the thermal-breakdown products of PBDEs, were also investigated. First, in order to evaluate the PBDE and PBDD/F level of collected dust in Japan, we compared the obtained data with those reported in previous studies. Then we tried to identify an indoor source of them in dust by evaluating the relevance of the concentration in dusts and the investigated indoor information.
@article{suzuki_pbdes_2006,
	title = {{PBDEs} and {PBDD}/{Fs} in house and office dust from {Japan}.},
	volume = {68},
	url = {http://www.dioxin20xx.org/pdfs/2006/06-425.pdf},
	abstract = {In order to reduce the accidental fire, brominated flame retardants (BFRs) such as PBDEs are added to plastics, polyurethane foams, and textiles for household materials. The rapid decrease in PBDE consumption after 1990 could be due to the industry's voluntary phasing out of PBDEs in Japan because of global concern regarding their potential adverse environmental and health effects and their thermal-breakdown products.1 However, lots of products such as TV and computer have contained PBDEs used in the past, which may be sources of them in the indoor air.2 Previous studies have indicated that PBDEs accumulate through food chain and are potential toxic compounds for human, suggesting that the control strategy for them contained in products is very important. Recently, the analysis of PBDEs in house dust has been conducted all over the world, indicating that PBDE concentrations of house dust are relatively higher than other media such as sediment. 3-6 Many researchers also demonstrated the importance of house dust as the routes of human exposure to PBDEs. On the other hand, there is no systematic monitoring investigation for grasping PBDEs level of dust in Japan. In this study, we investigated the PBDE concentrations in dust derived from household and office in Japan. PBDD/Fs, the thermal-breakdown products of PBDEs, were also investigated. First, in order to evaluate the PBDE and PBDD/F level of collected dust in Japan, we compared the obtained data with those reported in previous studies. Then we tried to identify an indoor source of them in dust by evaluating the relevance of the concentration in dusts and the investigated indoor information.},
	journal = {Organohalogen Compounds},
	author = {Suzuki, G and Nose, K and Takigami, H and Takahashi, S and Sakai, SI},
	year = {2006},
	keywords = {Dust, Flame retardants, ffr, frelec},
	pages = {1843--1846}
}
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