Thermal vaporization-vacuum ultraviolet laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of single aerosol particles. Sykes, D., C.; Woods, E.; Smith, G., D.; Baer, T.; and Miller, R., E. Analytical Chemistry, 74(9):2048-2052, 2002.
Thermal vaporization-vacuum ultraviolet laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of single aerosol particles [pdf]Paper  Thermal vaporization-vacuum ultraviolet laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of single aerosol particles [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Single aerosol particles of ethylene glycol and oleic acid are vaporized on a heater at temperatures between 500 and 700 1, and the resulting vapor plume is ionized by a 10.5-eV vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser. The mass spectra are compared to those obtained by CO2 laser vaporization followed by VUV laser ionization. The relative intensities of the parent and fragment ion peaks are remarkably similar for the two modes of vaporization. A Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of speeds accurately describes the dependence of the signal as a function of the VUV laser pulse timing. The signal levels obtained with this design are sufficient to obtain good-quality mass spectra.
@article{
 title = {Thermal vaporization-vacuum ultraviolet laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of single aerosol particles},
 type = {article},
 year = {2002},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Controlled dimensions,aerodynamic lenses,beams,chemical-analysis,divergence,motion,nozzle expansions},
 pages = {2048-2052},
 volume = {74},
 websites = {<Go to ISI>://000175358800043},
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 created = {2015-05-08T02:34:11.000Z},
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 abstract = {Single aerosol particles of ethylene glycol and oleic acid are vaporized on a heater at temperatures between 500 and 700 1, and the resulting vapor plume is ionized by a 10.5-eV vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser. The mass spectra are compared to those obtained by CO2 laser vaporization followed by VUV laser ionization. The relative intensities of the parent and fragment ion peaks are remarkably similar for the two modes of vaporization. A Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of speeds accurately describes the dependence of the signal as a function of the VUV laser pulse timing. The signal levels obtained with this design are sufficient to obtain good-quality mass spectra.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Sykes, D C and Woods, E and Smith, G D and Baer, T and Miller, R E},
 journal = {Analytical Chemistry},
 number = {9}
}
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