Working-Class Wives in Suburbia: Fulfillment or Crisis?. Tallman, I. Journal of Marriage and Family, 31(1):65–72, 1969. ZSCC: 0000028
Working-Class Wives in Suburbia: Fulfillment or Crisis? [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
[Data comparing working-class families living in a suburb with similar families living in a central city are presented which challenge some commonly held assumptions about suburban life. It is suggested that for working-class women, moving to the suburbs takes on the social-psychological characteristics of a crisis. Evidence is presented to support two propositions: (1) upward mobility deprives these women of a system of structural supports and therefore increases their sense of social isolation and disaffection; and (2) the sense of social disaffection is associated with a breakdown in primary group relations. The move to the suburbs is considered as a special case relevant to these generalizations. A sequence of events leading to social disaffection is inferred starting with migration away from neighborhoods and families of orientation. This leads to isolation and the need to change conjugal and external roles which, in turn, makes marital conflict a more salient issue, thereby increasing the disaffection of the women involved.]
@article{tallman_working-class_1969,
	title = {Working-{Class} {Wives} in {Suburbia}: {Fulfillment} or {Crisis}?},
	volume = {31},
	issn = {0022-2445},
	shorttitle = {Working-{Class} {Wives} in {Suburbia}},
	url = {https://www.jstor.org/stable/350009},
	doi = {10.2307/350009},
	abstract = {[Data comparing working-class families living in a suburb with similar families living in a central city are presented which challenge some commonly held assumptions about suburban life. It is suggested that for working-class women, moving to the suburbs takes on the social-psychological characteristics of a crisis. Evidence is presented to support two propositions: (1) upward mobility deprives these women of a system of structural supports and therefore increases their sense of social isolation and disaffection; and (2) the sense of social disaffection is associated with a breakdown in primary group relations. The move to the suburbs is considered as a special case relevant to these generalizations. A sequence of events leading to social disaffection is inferred starting with migration away from neighborhoods and families of orientation. This leads to isolation and the need to change conjugal and external roles which, in turn, makes marital conflict a more salient issue, thereby increasing the disaffection of the women involved.]},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2019-03-23},
	journal = {Journal of Marriage and Family},
	author = {Tallman, Irving},
	year = {1969},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000028},
	keywords = {more than 5 citations, read},
	pages = {65--72}
}
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