Business school administrators' and faculty perceptions of online learning: A comparative study. Tanner, J. R.; Noser, T. C.; Michael; and Totaro, W. Issues in Innovation, 3:93--112. 1
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In this paper, the authors compare business school administrators' and faculty perceptions of online learning. Specifically, a survey was given to a random sample of 1,000 business school administrators throughout the United States. A slightly modified survey, tailored to business school faculty, was mailed to a random sample of 1,175 business faculty members throughout the United States. Comparison of the results from each group showed significant differences between the administrators' and faculty perceptions of online learning on eight of eighteen statements. Since many universities are still deciding the extent of their offerings of such courses, this information may be helpful to university administrators in deciding which types of courses at their universities might be offered online. Faculty who are considering teaching one or more online courses may find the results of this study helpful in structuring these online offerings. Administrators need to be aware of the perceptions, concerns, and indeed, the anxieties of both their peers and faculty in order to enhance the likelihood that online courses will be viewed as valuable, and valued by, both constituencies. If administrators can effectively communicate the benefits perceived by their peers and faculty, while belaying the concerns of these groups, then the probability of a successful outcome will be enhanced. Online learning may not be for everyone - including both administrators and faculty - but a clearer grasp of administrator and faculty perceptions may go a long way in contributing to making the online experience a positive one for all who pursue it. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Issues in Innovation is the property of Innovation Congress and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
@article{ tanner_business_????-1,
  title = {Business school administrators' and faculty perceptions of online learning: {A} comparative study},
  volume = {3},
  issn = {19434820},
  shorttitle = {Business {School} {Administrators}' and {Faculty} {Perceptions} of {Online} {Learning}: a {Comparative} {Study}},
  url = {http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&AN=47478258&site=ehost-live},
  abstract = {In this paper, the authors compare business school administrators' and faculty perceptions of online learning. Specifically, a survey was given to a random sample of 1,000 business school administrators throughout the United States. A slightly modified survey, tailored to business school faculty, was mailed to a random sample of 1,175 business faculty members throughout the United States. Comparison of the results from each group showed significant differences between the administrators' and faculty perceptions of online learning on eight of eighteen statements. Since many universities are still deciding the extent of their offerings of such courses, this information may be helpful to university administrators in deciding which types of courses at their universities might be offered online. Faculty who are considering teaching one or more online courses may find the results of this study helpful in structuring these online offerings. Administrators need to be aware of the perceptions, concerns, and indeed, the anxieties of both their peers and faculty in order to enhance the likelihood that online courses will be viewed as valuable, and valued by, both constituencies. If administrators can effectively communicate the benefits perceived by their peers and faculty, while belaying the concerns of these groups, then the probability of a successful outcome will be enhanced. Online learning may not be for everyone - including both administrators and faculty - but a clearer grasp of administrator and faculty perceptions may go a long way in contributing to making the online experience a positive one for all who pursue it. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Issues in Innovation is the property of Innovation Congress and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)},
  journal = {Issues in Innovation},
  author = {Tanner, John R. and Noser, Thomas C. and Michael, W. Totaro},
  note = {1},
  keywords = {BUSINESS education, BUSINESS schools, COMPARATIVE studies, COMPUTER assisted instruction, INTERNET in education, ONLINE courses, SURVEYS, UNITED States, UNIVERSITIES \& colleges -- Faculty},
  pages = {93--112}
}
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