The anomalies of evidence‐based medicine in psychiatry: time to rethink the basis of mental health practice. Thomas, P.; Bracken, P.; and Timimi, S. Mental Health Review Journal, 17(3):152–162, September, 2012.
The anomalies of evidence‐based medicine in psychiatry: time to rethink the basis of mental health practice [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Purpose – Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a technical and scientific paradigm in clinical practice that has delivered major improvements in the outcome of care in medicine and surgery. However, its value in psychiatry is much less clear. The purpose of the paper is thus to examine its value by subjecting empirical evidence from EBM to a conceptual analysis using the philosophy of Thomas Kuhn. Design/methodology/approach – The authors examine evidence drawn from meta-analyses of RCTs investigating the efficacy of specific treatments for depression in the form of antidepressant drugs and CBT. This shows that the non-specific aspects of treatment, the placebo effect and the quality of the therapeutic alliance as seen by the patient, are more important in determining outcome than the specific elements (active drug, specific therapeutic elements of CBT).
@article{thomas_anomalies_2012,
	title = {The anomalies of evidence‐based medicine in psychiatry: time to rethink the basis of mental health practice},
	volume = {17},
	issn = {1361-9322},
	shorttitle = {The anomalies of evidence‐based medicine in psychiatry},
	url = {https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/13619321211287265/full/html},
	doi = {10.1108/13619321211287265},
	abstract = {Purpose – Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a technical and scientific paradigm in clinical practice that has delivered major improvements in the outcome of care in medicine and surgery. However, its value in psychiatry is much less clear. The purpose of the paper is thus to examine its value by subjecting empirical evidence from EBM to a conceptual analysis using the philosophy of Thomas Kuhn. Design/methodology/approach – The authors examine evidence drawn from meta-analyses of RCTs investigating the efficacy of specific treatments for depression in the form of antidepressant drugs and CBT. This shows that the non-specific aspects of treatment, the placebo effect and the quality of the therapeutic alliance as seen by the patient, are more important in determining outcome than the specific elements (active drug, specific therapeutic elements of CBT).},
	language = {en},
	number = {3},
	urldate = {2020-03-18},
	journal = {Mental Health Review Journal},
	author = {Thomas, Philip and Bracken, Pat and Timimi, Sami},
	month = sep,
	year = {2012},
	keywords = {clinical medicine, depression, evidence-based medicine, mental illness, recovery},
	pages = {152--162},
}
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