Seeing REDD+ as a project of environmental governance. Thompson, M. C.; Baruah, M.; and Carr, E. R. Environmental Science & Policy.
Seeing REDD+ as a project of environmental governance [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
In this paper, we argue that REDD+ is more than an impartial container for the various tools and actors concerned with addressing anthropogenic climate change. Instead, even as it takes shape, REDD+ is already functioning as a form of governance, a particular framing of the problem of climate change and its solutions that validates and legitimizes specific tools, actors and solutions while marginalizing others. This framing raises important questions about how we might critically evaluate REDD+ programs and their associated tools and stakeholders in a manner that encourages the most effective and equitable pursuit of its goals. We bring the issue of governance under REDD+ to the fore through a focus on the objects to be governed, the tools of governance, and the forms of environmental, economic and social knowledge that are considered legitimate under this framework. We then turn to the example of indigenous people's participation in REDD+ to illustrate how this framework attempts to bring about environmental governance by aligning the interests of a wide range of stakeholders in this process to bring about desired environmental outcomes. This consideration is critical for the implementation of REDD+, for as we illustrate, this alignment has thus far been incomplete, suggesting an emerging crisis of governance within REDD+ that will compromise future project and policy goals, and thus the well-being of many stakeholders.
@article{thompson_seeing_????,
	title = {Seeing {REDD}+ as a project of environmental governance},
	volume = {In Press, Corrected Proof},
	issn = {1462-9011},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com.proxy.lib.sfu.ca/science/article/B6VP6-51VXWNH-1/2/ca97f1ff10375b121d9c33e5704d7302},
	doi = {10.1016/j.envsci.2010.11.006},
	abstract = {In this paper, we argue that REDD+ is more than an impartial container for the various tools and actors concerned with addressing anthropogenic climate change. Instead, even as it takes shape, REDD+ is already functioning as a form of governance, a particular framing of the problem of climate change and its solutions that validates and legitimizes specific tools, actors and solutions while marginalizing others. This framing raises important questions about how we might critically evaluate REDD+ programs and their associated tools and stakeholders in a manner that encourages the most effective and equitable pursuit of its goals. We bring the issue of governance under REDD+ to the fore through a focus on the objects to be governed, the tools of governance, and the forms of environmental, economic and social knowledge that are considered legitimate under this framework. We then turn to the example of indigenous people's participation in REDD+ to illustrate how this framework attempts to bring about environmental governance by aligning the interests of a wide range of stakeholders in this process to bring about desired environmental outcomes. This consideration is critical for the implementation of REDD+, for as we illustrate, this alignment has thus far been incomplete, suggesting an emerging crisis of governance within REDD+ that will compromise future project and policy goals, and thus the well-being of many stakeholders.},
	urldate = {2011-01-06},
	journal = {Environmental Science \& Policy},
	author = {Thompson, Mary C. and Baruah, Manali and Carr, Edward R.},
	keywords = {FCPF, governance, Indigenous peoples, REDD+, UN-REDD},
	file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:files/18/Thompson et al. - Seeing REDD+ as a project of environmental governa.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:files/19/science.html:text/html}
}
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