Reflections on Trusting Trust Revisited. Thompson, K. 46(6):112.
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I thank the ACM for this award. I can't help but feel that I am receiving this honor for timing and serendip- ity as much as technical merit. UNIX1 swept into popu- larity with an industry-wide change from central main- frames to autonomous minis. I suspect that Daniel Bob- row [1] would be here instead of me if he could not afford a PDP-10 and had had to "settle" for a PDP-11. Moreover, the current state of UNIX is the result of the labors of a large number of people. There is an old adage, "Dance with the one that brought you," which means that I should talk about UNIX. I have not worked on mainstream UNIX in many years, yet I continue to get undeserved credit for the work of others. Therefore, I am not going to talk about UNIX, but I want to thank everyone who has contrib- uted. That brings me to Dennis Ritchie. Our collaboration has been a thing of beauty. In the ten years that we have worked together, I can recall only one case of miscoordination of work. On that occasion, I discovered that we both had written the same 20-line assembly language program. I compared the sources and was as- tounded to find that they matched character-for-char- acter. The result of our work together has been far greater than the work that we each contributed. I am a programmer. On my 1040 form, that is what I put down as my occupation. As a programmer, I write programs. I would like to present to you the cutest program I ever wrote. I will do this in three stages and try to bring it together at the end.
@article{thompsonReflectionsTrustingTrust1995,
  title = {Reflections on Trusting Trust Revisited},
  volume = {46},
  issn = {00010782},
  doi = {10.1145/777313.777347},
  abstract = {I thank the ACM for this award. I can't help but feel that I am receiving this honor for timing and serendip- ity as much as technical merit. UNIX1 swept into popu- larity with an industry-wide change from central main- frames to autonomous minis. I suspect that Daniel Bob- row [1] would be here instead of me if he could not afford a PDP-10 and had had to "settle" for a PDP-11. Moreover, the current state of UNIX is the result of the labors of a large number of people. There is an old adage, "Dance with the one that brought you," which means that I should talk about UNIX. I have not worked on mainstream UNIX in many years, yet I continue to get undeserved credit for the work of others. Therefore, I am not going to talk about UNIX, but I want to thank everyone who has contrib- uted. That brings me to Dennis Ritchie. Our collaboration has been a thing of beauty. In the ten years that we have worked together, I can recall only one case of miscoordination of work. On that occasion, I discovered that we both had written the same 20-line assembly language program. I compared the sources and was as- tounded to find that they matched character-for-char- acter. The result of our work together has been far greater than the work that we each contributed. I am a programmer. On my 1040 form, that is what I put down as my occupation. As a programmer, I write programs. I would like to present to you the cutest program I ever wrote. I will do this in three stages and try to bring it together at the end.},
  number = {6},
  journaltitle = {Communications of the ACM},
  date = {1995},
  pages = {112},
  author = {Thompson, Ken},
  file = {/home/dimitri/Nextcloud/Zotero/storage/IQBKUKA7/Thompson - 2003 - Reflections on trusting trust revisited.pdf}
}
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