The Effect of Herbicides and Crop Rotation on Weed Control in Glyphosate-Resistant Crops1. Tingle, C., H. & Chandler, J., M. Weed Technology, 18(4):940-946, Weed Science Society of America, 2004.
abstract   bibtex   
Field studies were conducted from 1998 through 2000 to determine the influence of crop rotation and level of herbicide system for johnsongrass, entireleaf morningglory, and smellmelon control in glyphosate-resistant cotton and corn. Three different crop rotation schedules were used including cotton–cotton–cotton, cotton–corn–cotton, and corn–cotton–corn. Herbicide systems involving various degrees of input levels (low, medium, and high) were compared with a conventional standard program. In 1998, weed control ranged from 80 to 95% for all herbicide systems when the rotation was corn–cotton–corn. In 1999 and 2000, the low-input herbicide system controlled entireleaf morningglory 76 to 78% late in the season. Decreased smellmelon control (78%) was also observed with the conventional standard during this same period. In the cotton–corn–cotton rotation, lateseason entireleaf morningglory control decreased each year in the low-input system, regardless of crop. In 2000, late-season evaluations indicated lower weed control of all three species with the conventional standard program compared with the other input systems. Yield data from 2000 suggested that corn and seed cotton yields were influenced by crop rotation.
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 title = {The Effect of Herbicides and Crop Rotation on Weed Control in Glyphosate-Resistant Crops1},
 type = {article},
 year = {2004},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Entireleaf morningglory, johnsongrass, reduced her,weed control systems.},
 pages = {940-946},
 volume = {18},
 websites = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1614/WT-02-126},
 publisher = {Weed Science Society of America},
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 tags = {United States,corn,cotton,economic,herbicide tolerance,productivity},
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 abstract = {Field studies were conducted from 1998 through 2000 to determine the influence of crop rotation and level of herbicide system for johnsongrass, entireleaf morningglory, and smellmelon control in glyphosate-resistant cotton and corn. Three different crop rotation schedules were used including cotton–cotton–cotton, cotton–corn–cotton, and corn–cotton–corn. Herbicide systems involving various degrees of input levels (low, medium, and high) were compared with a conventional standard program. In 1998, weed control ranged from 80 to 95% for all herbicide systems when the rotation was corn–cotton–corn. In 1999 and 2000, the low-input herbicide system controlled entireleaf morningglory 76 to 78% late in the season. Decreased smellmelon control (78%) was also observed with the conventional standard during this same period. In the cotton–corn–cotton rotation, lateseason entireleaf morningglory control decreased each year in the low-input system, regardless of crop. In 2000, late-season evaluations indicated lower weed control of all three species with the conventional standard program compared with the other input systems. Yield data from 2000 suggested that corn and seed cotton yields were influenced by crop rotation.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Tingle, C H and Chandler, J M},
 journal = {Weed Technology},
 number = {4}
}

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