Enormous Wildfires Spark Scramble to Improve Fire Models. Tollefson, J. 561(7721):16–17.
Enormous Wildfires Spark Scramble to Improve Fire Models [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Blazes in North America are becoming larger and more powerful. [Excerpt] [...] ” Something is definitely different, and it raises questions about how much we really know,” says Max Moritz, a fire scientist at the University of California, Santa Barbara. [...] Researchers have been at a loss to explain a flurry of unusual fire behaviour in California in recent years: wildfires that burn hot throughout the night instead of settling down, as many used to; blazes that race down hillsides faster than before; and fires that torch suburban neighbourhoods once considered safe from such events. And in July, a tornado with unprecedented wind speeds of 230 kilometres per hour spun up inside a fire near Redding, California. [] The problem, Moritz says, is that most of the fire models in use today are based on data from the past two or three decades. But it seems that fire behaviour might be shifting in response to climate faster than anybody expected, and that makes it increasingly problematic to extrapolate from past trends, he adds. [] ” More frequent, extreme fire behaviour is actually sort of expected, but just saying that it's going to happen isn't enough,” says Dave Sapsis, who specializes in fire modelling and behaviour at the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE), based in Sacramento. ” We need to refocus some of our research efforts on characterizing the kinds of fire behaviour that cause us the most grief.” [...]
@article{tollefsonEnormousWildfiresSpark2018,
  title = {Enormous Wildfires Spark Scramble to Improve Fire Models},
  author = {Tollefson, Jeff},
  date = {2018-08},
  journaltitle = {Nature},
  volume = {561},
  pages = {16--17},
  issn = {0028-0836},
  doi = {10.1038/d41586-018-06090-0},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-018-06090-0},
  abstract = {Blazes in North America are becoming larger and more powerful.

[Excerpt] [...] ” Something is definitely different, and it raises questions about how much we really know,” says Max Moritz, a fire scientist at the University of California, Santa Barbara. [...] Researchers have been at a loss to explain a flurry of unusual fire behaviour in California in recent years: wildfires that burn hot throughout the night instead of settling down, as many used to; blazes that race down hillsides faster than before; and fires that torch suburban neighbourhoods once considered safe from such events. And in July, a tornado with unprecedented wind speeds of 230 kilometres per hour spun up inside a fire near Redding, California.

[] The problem, Moritz says, is that most of the fire models in use today are based on data from the past two or three decades. But it seems that fire behaviour might be shifting in response to climate faster than anybody expected, and that makes it increasingly problematic to extrapolate from past trends, he adds. 

[] ” More frequent, extreme fire behaviour is actually sort of expected, but just saying that it's going to happen isn't enough,” says Dave Sapsis, who specializes in fire modelling and behaviour at the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE), based in Sacramento. ” We need to refocus some of our research efforts on characterizing the kinds of fire behaviour that cause us the most grief.” [...]},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-14633123,~to-add-doi-URL,climate-change,climate-extremes,extreme-events,extreme-weather,fire-behavior-prediction,forest-resources,north-america,vegetation,wildfires},
  number = {7721}
}
Downloads: 0