An improved method for mapping cerebrovascular reserve using concurrent fMRI and near infrared spectroscopy with Regressor Interpolation at Progressive Time Delays (RIPTiDe). Tong, Y.; Bergethon, P. R.; and Frederick, B. d. B. NeuroImage.
An improved method for mapping cerebrovascular reserve using concurrent fMRI and near infrared spectroscopy with Regressor Interpolation at Progressive Time Delays (RIPTiDe) [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
\textlessp\textgreater\textlessbr/\textgreaterCerebrovascular reserve (CVR) reflects the compensatory dilatory capacity of cerebral vasculature to a dilatory stimulus. Blood Oxygen-Level Dependent (BOLD) fMRI has been proven to be an effective imaging technique to obtain CVR maps when subjects perform CO2 inhalation or a breath holding (BH) task. Here we propose a novel way to process the fMRI data obtained during a blocked BH task by using simultaneously collected near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) data as regressors to estimate the vascular contribution to the BOLD signal.\textlessbr/\textgreaterSix healthy subjects underwent a 6 minute 30 second resting state (RS) fMRI scan, followed by a scan of the same duration with a blocked BH task (5 breath holds with 20 s durations separated by \textasciitilde 40 s of regular breathing). NIRS data was recorded from a probe over the subjects' right prefrontal area. For each scan, the time course of changes in total hemoglobin ([Delta][tHb]) was calculated from the NIRS data, time shifted by various amounts, and resampled to the fMRI acquisition rate. Each shifted time course was used as regressor in a general linear model analysis. The maximum parameter estimate across all time shifts was calculated at all voxels in both the BH and RS scans, and then converted into signal percentage changes. The ratio of these signal changes generates a CVR map of the BH response, normalized to the resting state. The NIRS regressor method makes no assumptions about the shape (or presence) of the BH response, and allows direct, quantitative comparison of the vascular BOLD response to BH to the baseline map obtained in the resting state.\textless/p\textgreater
@article{tong_improved_nodate,
	title = {An improved method for mapping cerebrovascular reserve using concurrent {fMRI} and near infrared spectroscopy with {Regressor} {Interpolation} at {Progressive} {Time} {Delays} ({RIPTiDe})},
	volume = {In Press, Accepted Manuscript},
	issn = {1053-8119},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6WNP-52HJP13-7/2/04686038634e6067cf65b881b47be687},
	doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.03.071},
	abstract = {{\textless}p{\textgreater}{\textless}br/{\textgreater}Cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) reflects the compensatory dilatory capacity of cerebral vasculature to a dilatory stimulus. Blood Oxygen-Level Dependent (BOLD) fMRI has been proven to be an effective imaging technique to obtain CVR maps when subjects perform CO2 inhalation or a breath holding (BH) task. Here we propose a novel way to process the fMRI data obtained during a blocked BH task by using simultaneously collected near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) data as regressors to estimate the vascular contribution to the BOLD signal.{\textless}br/{\textgreater}Six healthy subjects underwent a 6 minute 30 second resting state (RS) fMRI scan, followed by a scan of the same duration with a blocked BH task (5 breath holds with 20 s durations separated by {\textasciitilde} 40 s of regular breathing). NIRS data was recorded from a probe over the subjects' right prefrontal area. For each scan, the time course of changes in total hemoglobin ([Delta][tHb]) was calculated from the NIRS data, time shifted by various amounts, and resampled to the fMRI acquisition rate. Each shifted time course was used as regressor in a general linear model analysis. The maximum parameter estimate across all time shifts was calculated at all voxels in both the BH and RS scans, and then converted into signal percentage changes. The ratio of these signal changes generates a CVR map of the BH response, normalized to the resting state. The NIRS regressor method makes no assumptions about the shape (or presence) of the BH response, and allows direct, quantitative comparison of the vascular BOLD response to BH to the baseline map obtained in the resting state.{\textless}/p{\textgreater}},
	urldate = {2011-04-06},
	journal = {NeuroImage},
	author = {Tong, Yunjie and Bergethon, Peter R. and Frederick, Blaise de B.},
	file = {ScienceDirect Snapshot:/Users/nickb/Zotero/storage/4BMG949K/science.html:text/html;tong2011.pdf:/Users/nickb/Zotero/storage/F4CCW756/Tong et al. - An improved method for mapping cerebrovascular res.pdf:application/pdf}
}
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