It's not easy being green: The evolution of galaxy colour in the EAGLE simulation. Trayford, J. W., Theuns, T., Bower, R. G., Crain, R. A., Lagos, C. d. P., Schaller, M., & Schaye, J. arXiv:1601.07907 [astro-ph], January, 2016. arXiv: 1601.07907
It's not easy being green: The evolution of galaxy colour in the EAGLE simulation [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
We examine the evolution of intrinsic u-r colours of galaxies in the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, which has been shown to reproduce the observed redshift z=0.1 colour-magnitude distribution well. The median u-r of star-forming ('blue cloud') galaxies reddens by 1 mag from z=2 to 0 at fixed stellar mass, as their specific star formation rates decrease with time. A red sequence starts to build-up around z=1, due to the quenching of low-mass satellite galaxies at the faint end, and due to the quenching of more massive central galaxies by their active galactic nuclei (AGN) at the bright end. This leaves a dearth of intermediate-mass red sequence galaxies at z=1, which is mostly filled in by z=0. We quantify the time-scales of colour transition due to satellite and AGN quenching, finding that most galaxies spend less than 2 Gyr in the 'green valley'. On examining the trajectories of galaxies in a colour-stellar mass diagram, we identify three characteristic tracks that galaxies follow (quiescently star-forming, quenching and rejuvenating galaxies) and quantify the fraction of galaxies that follow each track.
@article{trayford_its_2016,
	title = {It's not easy being green: {The} evolution of galaxy colour in the {EAGLE} simulation},
	shorttitle = {It's not easy being green},
	url = {http://arxiv.org/abs/1601.07907},
	abstract = {We examine the evolution of intrinsic u-r colours of galaxies in the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, which has been shown to reproduce the observed redshift z=0.1 colour-magnitude distribution well. The median u-r of star-forming ('blue cloud') galaxies reddens by 1 mag from z=2 to 0 at fixed stellar mass, as their specific star formation rates decrease with time. A red sequence starts to build-up around z=1, due to the quenching of low-mass satellite galaxies at the faint end, and due to the quenching of more massive central galaxies by their active galactic nuclei (AGN) at the bright end. This leaves a dearth of intermediate-mass red sequence galaxies at z=1, which is mostly filled in by z=0. We quantify the time-scales of colour transition due to satellite and AGN quenching, finding that most galaxies spend less than 2 Gyr in the 'green valley'. On examining the trajectories of galaxies in a colour-stellar mass diagram, we identify three characteristic tracks that galaxies follow (quiescently star-forming, quenching and rejuvenating galaxies) and quantify the fraction of galaxies that follow each track.},
	urldate = {2016-02-08},
	journal = {arXiv:1601.07907 [astro-ph]},
	author = {Trayford, James W. and Theuns, Tom and Bower, Richard G. and Crain, Robert A. and Lagos, Claudia del P. and Schaller, Matthieu and Schaye, Joop},
	month = jan,
	year = {2016},
	note = {arXiv: 1601.07907},
	keywords = {Astrophysics - Astrophysics of Galaxies},
}

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