A Framework for Vulnerability Analysis in Sustainability Science. Turner, B. L.; Kasperson, R. E.; Matson, P. A.; McCarthy, J. J.; Corell, R. W.; Christensen, L.; Eckley, N.; Kasperson, J. X.; Luers, A.; Martello, M. L.; Polsky, C.; Pulsipher, A.; and Schiller, A. 100(14):8074–8079.
A Framework for Vulnerability Analysis in Sustainability Science [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Global environmental change and sustainability science increasingly recognize the need to address the consequences of changes taking place in the structure and function of the biosphere. These changes raise questions such as: Who and what are vulnerable to the multiple environmental changes underway, and where? Research demonstrates that vulnerability is registered not by exposure to hazards (perturbations and stresses) alone but also resides in the sensitivity and resilience of the system experiencing such hazards. This recognition requires revisions and enlargements in the basic design of vulnerability assessments, including the capacity to treat coupled human-environment systems and those linkages within and without the systems that affect their vulnerability. A vulnerability framework for the assessment of coupled human-environment systems is presented.
@article{turnerFrameworkVulnerabilityAnalysis2003,
  title = {A Framework for Vulnerability Analysis in Sustainability Science},
  author = {Turner, B. L. and Kasperson, Roger E. and Matson, Pamela A. and McCarthy, James J. and Corell, Robert W. and Christensen, Lindsey and Eckley, Noelle and Kasperson, Jeanne X. and Luers, Amy and Martello, Marybeth L. and Polsky, Colin and Pulsipher, Alexander and Schiller, Andrew},
  date = {2003-07},
  journaltitle = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  volume = {100},
  pages = {8074--8079},
  issn = {1091-6490},
  doi = {10.1073/pnas.1231335100},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1231335100},
  abstract = {Global environmental change and sustainability science increasingly recognize the need to address the consequences of changes taking place in the structure and function of the biosphere. These changes raise questions such as: Who and what are vulnerable to the multiple environmental changes underway, and where? Research demonstrates that vulnerability is registered not by exposure to hazards (perturbations and stresses) alone but also resides in the sensitivity and resilience of the system experiencing such hazards. This recognition requires revisions and enlargements in the basic design of vulnerability assessments, including the capacity to treat coupled human-environment systems and those linkages within and without the systems that affect their vulnerability. A vulnerability framework for the assessment of coupled human-environment systems is presented.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-3682304,array-of-factors,climate-change,complexity,environment-society-economy,natural-hazards,sustainability,vulnerability},
  number = {14}
}
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