Physicians working in oncology identified challenges and factors that facilitated communication with families when children could not be cured. Udo, C., Kreicbergs, U., Axelsson, B., Björk, O., & Lövgren, M. In Acta Paediatrica, volume 108:12, s. 2285-2291. Acta Paediatrica, 2019.
Physicians working in oncology identified challenges and factors that facilitated communication with families when children could not be cured [pdf]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Aim: We explored physicians’ experiences of communicating with families when their child had cancer and a cure was no longer an option, by focusing on barriers and facilitating factors.Methods: Physicians from the six cancer centres in Sweden took part in focus group discussions from December 2017 and May 2018 and the data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Focus groups enabled us to gather individual and shared perspectives.Results: The 35 physicians (20 male) had a mean age of 47 (range 31-74) and a mean of 11 years’ experience in oncology, ranging from under one year to 43 years. They reported communication challenges when a cure was not possible, namely: emotional and mental drain, lack of mutual understanding and uncertainty about communication skills. They also reported facilitating factors: flexibility in complex conversations, the child’s position in the conversations, continuity and trusting relationships, support from colleagues and having discussed the potentially life-threatening nature of cancer from the very start of treatment.Conclusion: Physicians working in paediatric oncology perceived challenges and facilitating factors in their communication with families when a cure was not an option. Training to overcome communication issues could support the early integration of palliative care and curative treatment.
@incollection{udo_physicians_2019,
	title = {Physicians working in oncology identified challenges and factors that facilitated communication with families when children could not be cured},
	volume = {108:12, s. 2285-2291},
	isbn = {0803-5253},
	url = {http://du.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:1324253/FULLTEXT01.pdf},
	abstract = {Aim: We explored physicians’ experiences of communicating with families when their child had cancer and a cure was no longer an option, by focusing on barriers and facilitating factors.Methods: Physicians from the six cancer centres in Sweden took part in focus group discussions from December 2017 and May 2018 and the data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Focus groups enabled us to gather individual and shared perspectives.Results: The 35 physicians (20 male) had a mean age of 47 (range 31-74) and a mean of 11 years’ experience in oncology, ranging from under one year to 43 years. They reported communication challenges when a cure was not possible, namely: emotional and mental drain, lack of mutual understanding and uncertainty about communication skills. They also reported facilitating factors: flexibility in complex conversations, the child’s position in the conversations, continuity and trusting relationships, support from colleagues and having discussed the potentially life-threatening nature of cancer from the very start of treatment.Conclusion: Physicians working in paediatric oncology perceived challenges and facilitating factors in their communication with families when a cure was not an option. Training to overcome communication issues could support the early integration of palliative care and curative treatment.},
	booktitle = {Acta {Paediatrica}},
	publisher = {Acta Paediatrica},
	author = {Udo, Camilla and Kreicbergs, Ulrika and Axelsson, Bertil and Björk, Olle and Lövgren, Malin},
	year = {2019},
}
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