Aerosol and surface stability of SARS-CoV-2 as compared with SARS-CoV-1. Van Doremalen, N., Bushmaker, T., Morris, D., H., Holbrook, M., G., Gamble, A., Williamson, B., N., Tamin, A., Harcourt, J., L., Thornburg, N., J., Gerber, S., I., Lloyd-Smith, J., O., De Wit, E., & Munster, V., J. 4, 2020.
Aerosol and surface stability of SARS-CoV-2 as compared with SARS-CoV-1 [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Study measures the survival of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV-1 on several different materials and in nebulised aerosols in a Goldberg drum using TCID50 to measure viable virus concentration. The duration of the aerosol experiment (nebulised aerosol in a Goldberg drum, RH 65%, 21-23 °C) was 3 hours over which a TCID50 drop of around 85% was observed for SARS-CoV-2. It appeared to follow an exponential decay with a half life of 2.7 hours. This was similar in both SARS-CoV-1 and 2. Surface survival was best on plastic and stainless steel. Viable virus could still be detected after 72 hours but TCID50 had dropped by 2 orders of magnitude. Surface survival also followed an exponential decay.
@misc{
 title = {Aerosol and surface stability of SARS-CoV-2 as compared with SARS-CoV-1},
 type = {misc},
 year = {2020},
 source = {New England Journal of Medicine},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Fomite,Goldberg drum,TCID50,Virus survival,surface survival,viability},
 pages = {1564-1567},
 volume = {382},
 issue = {16},
 websites = {http://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMc2004973},
 month = {4},
 publisher = {Massachussetts Medical Society},
 day = {16},
 id = {c61509ca-6959-3658-b9ef-f2ef8b3d1e01},
 created = {2020-08-24T12:02:09.950Z},
 accessed = {2020-07-27},
 file_attached = {false},
 profile_id = {317fdcd2-b041-3222-bca0-702f39879f87},
 group_id = {b3d61752-de2a-32fd-8576-9b4f9cb05f29},
 last_modified = {2020-08-24T12:02:09.950Z},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {true},
 hidden = {false},
 citation_key = {VanDoremalen2020},
 private_publication = {false},
 abstract = {Study measures the survival of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV-1 on several different materials and in nebulised aerosols in a Goldberg drum using TCID50 to measure viable virus concentration. The duration of the aerosol experiment (nebulised aerosol in a Goldberg drum, RH 65%, 21-23 °C) was 3 hours over which a TCID50 drop of around 85% was observed for SARS-CoV-2. It appeared to follow an exponential decay with a half life of 2.7 hours. This was similar in both SARS-CoV-1 and 2. Surface survival was best on plastic and stainless steel. Viable virus could still be detected after 72 hours but TCID50 had dropped by 2 orders of magnitude. Surface survival also followed an exponential decay.},
 bibtype = {misc},
 author = {Van Doremalen, Neeltje and Bushmaker, Trenton and Morris, Dylan H. and Holbrook, Myndi G. and Gamble, Amandine and Williamson, Brandi N. and Tamin, Azaibi and Harcourt, Jennifer L. and Thornburg, Natalie J. and Gerber, Susan I. and Lloyd-Smith, James O. and De Wit, Emmie and Munster, Vincent J.}
}

Downloads: 0