What are the patient-reported outcomes of trapeziectomy and tendon suspension at long-term follow-up?. Wolf, J. M., Turkiewicz, A., Englund, M., Karlsson, J., Arner, M., & Atroshi, I. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research®, 479(9):2009–2018, September, 2021.
What are the patient-reported outcomes of trapeziectomy and tendon suspension at long-term follow-up? [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Background  There are multiple options for the treatment of thumb carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis (CMC1 OA), with evidence for pain relief and improved function. Although simple trapeziectomy has the lowest complication risk, tendon suspension of the first metacarpal and interposition is still the most commonly used surgical procedure in patients with CMC1 OA. Although there are several reports of good short-term results after trapeziectomy and tendon suspension-interposition arthroplasty, few studies have evaluated long-term outcomes. This study is one of the largest and longest follow-up evaluations of a cohort of patients with CMC1 OA who were treated with trapeziectomy and suspension-interposition arthroplasty, capturing 96% of the original cohort for evaluation. Questions/purposes  (1) After trapeziectomy and tendon suspension surgery, what are the long-term, patient-reported outcomes and clinical measurements (strength and ROM); and in unilateral procedures, how do these parameters compare with those of the contralateral hand that was not operated on? (2) What is the mean subsidence (unloaded trapezial space), and does pinch strength correlate with the amount of subsidence? Methods  From 1998 to 2005, 130 patients underwent trapeziectomy and abductor pollicis longus (APL) suspension-interposition arthroplasty for CMC1 OA at one orthopaedic department. During this period, 15 patients were treated with CMC1 arthrodesis and four were treated with implant arthroplasty, for a total of 149 patients. The surgeons used APL suspensionplasty for most patients, based on age and expected postoperative function; they also employed this procedure to avoid hardware or implant failure issues. The 100 living patients were asked to participate in this retrospective study, 96% (96) of whom were enrolled. The mean age at surgery was 58 ± 7 years. The patients completed a two-item thumb pain scale (modified from the SF-36 body pain scale), a hand pain VAS (average level of pain experienced over the week preceding measurement), and the 11-item QuickDASH. Patient-reported outcomes data were obtained from all 96 patients, and 83% (80) of patients underwent bilateral hand radiography and a physical examination at a mean follow-up of 17 ± 2.4 years. We calculated outcome data for each patient, and in 39 patients with unilateral surgery and intact contralateral CMC1 joint, we compared the operated side with the contralateral side. We compared our outcome data with that from the Swedish National Quality Registry for Hand Surgery (HAKIR), noting comparable outcomes for pain and QuickDASH scores. Results  At long-term follow-up after trapeziectomy and APL suspension surgery, the mean thumb pain score was 19 ± 26, hand pain VAS score 23 ± 25, and QuickDASH score 26 ± 21. In the patients with unilateral surgery and intact contralateral CMC1 joint, the thumb pain score for the operated side was lower than the contralateral side, specifically 19 ± 25 compared with 29 ± 30 (mean difference -9.8 [95% CI -19.5 to -0.2]; p = 0.045); hand pain VAS score was 24 ± 23 versus 30 ± 25 (mean difference -6.1 [95% CI -15.2 to 3.1]; p = 0.19), and the QuickDASH score was 27 ± 19. Grip strength showed no differences between the operated and contralateral sides (mean 16.7 ± 7.3 kg versus 16.6 ± 6.9 kg, mean difference 0.1 [95% CI -1.6 to 1.8]; p = 0.90), while pinch was different (4.4 ± 1.4 versus 5.0 ± 1.5 kg, mean difference -0.6 [95% CI -0.9 to -0.3]; p = 0.001). The mean trapezial space was 4.4 ± 2.2 mm, and there was no association between the trapezial space and pinch strength (0.07 kg [95% CI -0.04 to 0.18] per mm of space; p = 0.17). Conclusion  The finding of comparable pain and function between operated and unoperated sides at long-term follow-up suggests that trapeziectomy and tendon suspension-interposition arthroplasty provides predictable outcomes, and surgeons can use these data to counsel patients that surgery can potentially return them to comparable use. However, as patients often have asymptomatic radiographic OA on the contralateral side, future studies are needed to examine the impact of asymptomatic disease on function. Level of Evidence  Level IV, therapeutic study.
@article{wolf_what_2021,
	title = {What are the patient-reported outcomes of trapeziectomy and tendon suspension at long-term follow-up?},
	volume = {479},
	issn = {0009-921X},
	url = {https://journals.lww.com/clinorthop/Abstract/2021/09000/What_Are_the_Patient_reported_Outcomes_of.24.aspx},
	doi = {10.1097/CORR.0000000000001795},
	abstract = {Background 
        There are multiple options for the treatment of thumb carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis (CMC1 OA), with evidence for pain relief and improved function. Although simple trapeziectomy has the lowest complication risk, tendon suspension of the first metacarpal and interposition is still the most commonly used surgical procedure in patients with CMC1 OA. Although there are several reports of good short-term results after trapeziectomy and tendon suspension-interposition arthroplasty, few studies have evaluated long-term outcomes. This study is one of the largest and longest follow-up evaluations of a cohort of patients with CMC1 OA who were treated with trapeziectomy and suspension-interposition arthroplasty, capturing 96\% of the original cohort for evaluation.
        Questions/purposes 
        (1) After trapeziectomy and tendon suspension surgery, what are the long-term, patient-reported outcomes and clinical measurements (strength and ROM); and in unilateral procedures, how do these parameters compare with those of the contralateral hand that was not operated on? (2) What is the mean subsidence (unloaded trapezial space), and does pinch strength correlate with the amount of subsidence?
        Methods 
        From 1998 to 2005, 130 patients underwent trapeziectomy and abductor pollicis longus (APL) suspension-interposition arthroplasty for CMC1 OA at one orthopaedic department. During this period, 15 patients were treated with CMC1 arthrodesis and four were treated with implant arthroplasty, for a total of 149 patients. The surgeons used APL suspensionplasty for most patients, based on age and expected postoperative function; they also employed this procedure to avoid hardware or implant failure issues. The 100 living patients were asked to participate in this retrospective study, 96\% (96) of whom were enrolled. The mean age at surgery was 58 ± 7 years. The patients completed a two-item thumb pain scale (modified from the SF-36 body pain scale), a hand pain VAS (average level of pain experienced over the week preceding measurement), and the 11-item QuickDASH. Patient-reported outcomes data were obtained from all 96 patients, and 83\% (80) of patients underwent bilateral hand radiography and a physical examination at a mean follow-up of 17 ± 2.4 years. We calculated outcome data for each patient, and in 39 patients with unilateral surgery and intact contralateral CMC1 joint, we compared the operated side with the contralateral side. We compared our outcome data with that from the Swedish National Quality Registry for Hand Surgery (HAKIR), noting comparable outcomes for pain and QuickDASH scores.
        Results 
        At long-term follow-up after trapeziectomy and APL suspension surgery, the mean thumb pain score was 19 ± 26, hand pain VAS score 23 ± 25, and QuickDASH score 26 ± 21. In the patients with unilateral surgery and intact contralateral CMC1 joint, the thumb pain score for the operated side was lower than the contralateral side, specifically 19 ± 25 compared with 29 ± 30 (mean difference -9.8 [95\% CI -19.5 to -0.2]; p = 0.045); hand pain VAS score was 24 ± 23 versus 30 ± 25 (mean difference -6.1 [95\% CI -15.2 to 3.1]; p = 0.19), and the QuickDASH score was 27 ± 19. Grip strength showed no differences between the operated and contralateral sides (mean 16.7 ± 7.3 kg versus 16.6 ± 6.9 kg, mean difference 0.1 [95\% CI -1.6 to 1.8]; p = 0.90), while pinch was different (4.4 ± 1.4 versus 5.0 ± 1.5 kg, mean difference -0.6 [95\% CI -0.9 to -0.3]; p = 0.001). The mean trapezial space was 4.4 ± 2.2 mm, and there was no association between the trapezial space and pinch strength (0.07 kg [95\% CI -0.04 to 0.18] per mm of space; p = 0.17).
        Conclusion 
        The finding of comparable pain and function between operated and unoperated sides at long-term follow-up suggests that trapeziectomy and tendon suspension-interposition arthroplasty provides predictable outcomes, and surgeons can use these data to counsel patients that surgery can potentially return them to comparable use. However, as patients often have asymptomatic radiographic OA on the contralateral side, future studies are needed to examine the impact of asymptomatic disease on function.
        Level of Evidence 
        Level IV, therapeutic study.},
	language = {en-US},
	number = {9},
	urldate = {2021-09-06},
	journal = {Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research®},
	author = {Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis and Turkiewicz, Aleksandra and Englund, Martin and Karlsson, Jon and Arner, Marianne and Atroshi, Isam},
	month = sep,
	year = {2021},
	pages = {2009--2018},
}

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