Be it ever so humble: Proposing a dual-dimension account and measurement of humility. Wright, J. C., Nadelhoffer, T., Thomson Ross, L., & Sinnott-Armstrong, W. Self and Identity, 17(1):92–125, January, 2018.
Be it ever so humble: Proposing a dual-dimension account and measurement of humility [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
What does it mean to be humble? We argue that humility is an epistemically and ethically aligned state of awareness – the experience of ourselves as a small part of a larger universe and as one among a host of other morally relevant beings. So conceived, humility can be operationalized and measured along the dual dimensions of low self-focus and high other-focus and is distinct from other related constructs (e.g., modesty and open-mindedness). We discuss our newly developed scale (Study 1 and 2), and provide preliminary validation using self-report (Study 3) and behavioral measures (Study 4), showing that humility is related to people’s general ethical orientation (e.g., empathy, universalism/benevolence, and civic responsibility), their well-being (e.g., sense of autonomy, lifepurpose, and secure attachment), mature religious beliefs/practices, and reactions to disagreement – specifically, people high in humility sat closer and less angled away from their conversation partner with whom they disagreed. Together, this provides support for our new Dual-Dimension Humility Scale.
@article{wright_be_2018,
	title = {Be it ever so humble: {Proposing} a dual-dimension account and measurement of humility},
	volume = {17},
	issn = {1529-8868, 1529-8876},
	shorttitle = {Be it ever so humble},
	url = {https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15298868.2017.1327454},
	doi = {10.1080/15298868.2017.1327454},
	abstract = {What does it mean to be humble? We argue that humility is an epistemically and ethically aligned state of awareness – the experience of ourselves as a small part of a larger universe and as one among a host of other morally relevant beings. So conceived, humility can be operationalized and measured along the dual dimensions of low self-focus and high other-focus and is distinct from other related constructs (e.g., modesty and open-mindedness). We discuss our newly developed scale (Study 1 and 2), and provide preliminary validation using self-report (Study 3) and behavioral measures (Study 4), showing that humility is related to people’s general ethical orientation (e.g., empathy, universalism/benevolence, and civic responsibility), their well-being (e.g., sense of autonomy, lifepurpose, and secure attachment), mature religious beliefs/practices, and reactions to disagreement – specifically, people high in humility sat closer and less angled away from their conversation partner with whom they disagreed. Together, this provides support for our new Dual-Dimension Humility Scale.},
	language = {en},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2020-04-02},
	journal = {Self and Identity},
	author = {Wright, Jennifer Cole and Nadelhoffer, Thomas and Thomson Ross, Lisa and Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter},
	month = jan,
	year = {2018},
	pages = {92--125},
}
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