Impact of microstructure evolution on the difference between geometric and reactive surface areas in natural chalk. Yang, Y., Bruns, S., Stipp, S., & Sørensen, H. Advances in Water Resources, 2018.
Impact of microstructure evolution on the difference between geometric and reactive surface areas in natural chalk [pdf]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
© 2018 Elsevier Ltd The coupling between flow and mineral dissolution drives the evolution of many natural and engineered flow systems. Pore surface changes as microstructure evolves but this transient behaviour has traditionally been difficult to model. We combined a reactor network model with experimental, greyscale tomography data to establish the morphological grounds for differences among geometric, reactive and apparent surface areas in dissolving chalk. This approach allowed us to study the effects of init ial geometry and macroscopic flow rate independently. The simulations showed that geometric surface, which represents a form of local transport heterogeneity, increases in an imposed flow field, even when the porous structure is chemically homogeneous. Hence, the fluid-reaction coupling leads to solid channelisation, which further results in fluid focusing and an increase in geometric surface area. Fluid focusing decreases the area of reactive surface and the residence time of reactant, both contribute to the over-normalisation of reaction rate. In addition, the growing and merging of microchannels, near the fluid entrance, contribute to the macroscopic, fast initial dissolution rate of rocks.
@article{
 title = {Impact of microstructure evolution on the difference between geometric and reactive surface areas in natural chalk},
 type = {article},
 year = {2018},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Chalk dissolution,Microstructure evolution,Porous media,Surface area,Tomography},
 volume = {115},
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 created = {2018-04-14T16:13:54.199Z},
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 abstract = {© 2018 Elsevier Ltd The coupling between flow and mineral dissolution drives the evolution of many natural and engineered flow systems. Pore surface changes as microstructure evolves but this transient behaviour has traditionally been difficult to model. We combined a reactor network model with experimental, greyscale tomography data to establish the morphological grounds for differences among geometric, reactive and apparent surface areas in dissolving chalk. This approach allowed us to study the effects of init ial geometry and macroscopic flow rate independently. The simulations showed that geometric surface, which represents a form of local transport heterogeneity, increases in an imposed flow field, even when the porous structure is chemically homogeneous. Hence, the fluid-reaction coupling leads to solid channelisation, which further results in fluid focusing and an increase in geometric surface area. Fluid focusing decreases the area of reactive surface and the residence time of reactant, both contribute to the over-normalisation of reaction rate. In addition, the growing and merging of microchannels, near the fluid entrance, contribute to the macroscopic, fast initial dissolution rate of rocks.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Yang, Y. and Bruns, S. and Stipp, S.L.S. and Sørensen, H.O.},
 journal = {Advances in Water Resources}
}
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