Afghanistan’s Displaced People. Yde-Jensen, T., Krishnan, N., Tan, X., & Wieser, C. Technical Report World Bank, Washington, D.C., August, 2018.
Afghanistan’s Displaced People [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Afghans represent the world’s largest protracted refugee population, and one of the largest populations to be repatriated to their country of origin in this century. Between 2002 and 2016, over six million refugees returned to Afghanistan from neighboring countries. In 2016 alone, returnees numbered more than a million. In an already difficult context, large-scale internal displacement and return from outside have strained the delivery of public services in Afghanistan and increased competition for scarce economic opportunities, not only for the displaced, but for the population at large. This note aims at contributing to our understanding of displacement in Afghanistan by comparing the socioeconomic profiles of three populations: (i) former refugees who returned to Afghanistan between 2002 and 2014 (“pre-2015 returnees”); (ii) internally displaced persons (“IDPs”); and (iii) non-displaced persons (“hosts”). The note captures and compares these groups’ situations at a specific time-point, using data from the 2013-14 Afghanistan Living Conditions Survey (ALCS). Importantly, the results document socioeconomic conditions just prior to the transfer of security responsibilities from international troops to the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) in 2014, which was associated with a subsequent decline in aid, both security and civilian, and a sharp drop in economic activity. The results presented here cover the largest return of Afghans to the county following the fall of the Taliban in 2002, but precede the more recent large-scale return of Afghan refugees from Pakistan in 2016-17. Future publications will extend the findings summarized here with analysis of new and existing data covering this recent influx. This research is part of an ongoing effort to document population displacement challenges and solutions in Afghanistan over time. Data from ALCS 2013-14 establish baseline socio-economic profiles for returned refugees, IDPs, and non-displaced hosts. Further research and analysis now in progress will document how these conditions have changed since 2013-14, and will distill evidence for policy to improve socio-economic outcomes among Afghanistan’s displaced and non-displaced people.
@techreport{yde-jensen_afghanistans_2018,
	address = {Washington, D.C.},
	type = {Report},
	title = {Afghanistan’s {Displaced} {People}},
	copyright = {http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo},
	url = {https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/30267},
	abstract = {Afghans represent the world’s largest 
            protracted refugee population, and one of the largest 
            populations to be repatriated to their country of origin in 
            this century. Between 2002 and 2016, over six million 
            refugees returned to Afghanistan from neighboring countries. 
            In 2016 alone, returnees numbered more than a million. In an 
            already difficult context, large-scale internal displacement 
            and return from outside have strained the delivery of public 
            services in Afghanistan and increased competition for scarce 
            economic opportunities, not only for the displaced, but for 
            the population at large. This note aims at contributing to 
            our understanding of displacement in Afghanistan by 
            comparing the socioeconomic profiles of three populations: 
            (i) former refugees who returned to Afghanistan between 2002 
            and 2014 (“pre-2015 returnees”); (ii) internally displaced 
            persons (“IDPs”); and (iii) non-displaced persons (“hosts”). 
            The note captures and compares these groups’ situations at a 
            specific time-point, using data from the 2013-14 Afghanistan 
            Living Conditions Survey (ALCS). Importantly, the results 
            document socioeconomic conditions just prior to the transfer 
            of security responsibilities from international troops to 
            the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) in 2014, which 
            was associated with a subsequent decline in aid, both 
            security and civilian, and a sharp drop in economic 
            activity. The results presented here cover the largest 
            return of Afghans to the county following the fall of the 
            Taliban in 2002, but precede the more recent large-scale 
            return of Afghan refugees from Pakistan in 2016-17. Future 
            publications will extend the findings summarized here with 
            analysis of new and existing data covering this recent 
            influx. This research is part of an ongoing effort to 
            document population displacement challenges and solutions in 
            Afghanistan over time. Data from ALCS 2013-14 establish 
            baseline socio-economic profiles for returned refugees, 
            IDPs, and non-displaced hosts. Further research and analysis 
            now in progress will document how these conditions have 
            changed since 2013-14, and will distill evidence for policy 
            to improve socio-economic outcomes among Afghanistan’s 
            displaced and non-displaced people.},
	language = {English},
	urldate = {2020-08-04},
	institution = {World Bank},
	author = {Yde-Jensen, Thea and Krishnan, Nandini and Tan, Xiayun and Wieser, Christina},
	month = aug,
	year = {2018},
	keywords = {Afghanistan, Host Community, IDPs, Middle East, Non-displaced hosts, Profiling Displaced Popolations, Refugees}
}
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