Person-centered Climate Questionnaire-Patient in English: A psychometric evaluation study in long-term care settings. Yoon, J., Y., Roberts, T., Grau, B., & Edvardsson, D. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 61(1):81-87, Elsevier Ireland Ltd, 2015.
abstract   bibtex   
BACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence that person-centered care improves nursing home residents' quality of life. Despite the clear focus of person-centered care on enhancing care for residents and engaging residents in care, there are few options available for measuring person-centered care from the perspective of the elder residents. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the English version of the Person-centered Climate Questionnaire-Patient (PCQ-P) in U.S. long-term care settings. METHODS: A total of 189 older adults from six nursing homes in the Midwestern United States were included. Convergent validity and known-group comparison were examined for construct validity. Exploratory factor analysis and second-order confirmatory factor analysis were utilized to examine the factor structure. Reliability was tested using Cronbach's alpha values for internal consistency. RESULTS: This study demonstrated a substantial convergent validity of the PCQ-P in English as higher scores correlated significantly with higher resident life satisfaction (r=0.459), and the satisfactory construct validity as evidenced by a significantly higher mean PCQ-P score from residents in higher quality nursing homes. Factor analysis demonstrated that the PCQ-P had three factors (hospitality, safety, and everydayness) in U.S. nursing home residents. The PCQ-P showed satisfactory internal consistency reliability (alpha=0.89). CONCLUSION: The English version of the PCQ-P is a valid and reliable tool to directly measure the perceptions of the person-centered climate in the U.S nursing homes. The simple and straightforward PCQ-P items are easy to administer to nursing home residents. Consequently, clinical staff can utilize the PCQ-P to assess the unit climate, and evaluate outcomes of person-centered interventions.
@article{
 title = {Person-centered Climate Questionnaire-Patient in English: A psychometric evaluation study in long-term care settings},
 type = {article},
 year = {2015},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Aged,Aged, 80 and over,Cross-Sectional Studies,Female,Humans,Instrument development,Language,Long-Term Care/organization & administration,Male,Nursing home,Patient-Centered Care/organization & administratio,Person-centered care,Psychometrics/methods,Quality of Life,Reliability,Reproducibility of Results,Surveys and Questionnaires,Validity},
 pages = {81-87},
 volume = {61},
 publisher = {Elsevier Ireland Ltd},
 city = {School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA. Electronic address: yoon26@wisc.edu.; Center for Women's Health, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, William S. Middleton Veteran Affairs Hospital, Madison, WI, USA; Schoo},
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 notes = {CI: Copyright (c) 2015; JID: 8214379; OTO: NOTNLM; 2014/12/01 [received]; 2015/03/27 [revised]; 2015/03/30 [accepted]; 2015/04/06 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
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 abstract = {BACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence that person-centered care improves nursing home residents' quality of life. Despite the clear focus of person-centered care on enhancing care for residents and engaging residents in care, there are few options available for measuring person-centered care from the perspective of the elder residents. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the English version of the Person-centered Climate Questionnaire-Patient (PCQ-P) in U.S. long-term care settings. METHODS: A total of 189 older adults from six nursing homes in the Midwestern United States were included. Convergent validity and known-group comparison were examined for construct validity. Exploratory factor analysis and second-order confirmatory factor analysis were utilized to examine the factor structure. Reliability was tested using Cronbach's alpha values for internal consistency. RESULTS: This study demonstrated a substantial convergent validity of the PCQ-P in English as higher scores correlated significantly with higher resident life satisfaction (r=0.459), and the satisfactory construct validity as evidenced by a significantly higher mean PCQ-P score from residents in higher quality nursing homes. Factor analysis demonstrated that the PCQ-P had three factors (hospitality, safety, and everydayness) in U.S. nursing home residents. The PCQ-P showed satisfactory internal consistency reliability (alpha=0.89). CONCLUSION: The English version of the PCQ-P is a valid and reliable tool to directly measure the perceptions of the person-centered climate in the U.S nursing homes. The simple and straightforward PCQ-P items are easy to administer to nursing home residents. Consequently, clinical staff can utilize the PCQ-P to assess the unit climate, and evaluate outcomes of person-centered interventions.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Yoon, J Y and Roberts, T and Grau, B and Edvardsson, D},
 journal = {Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics},
 number = {1}
}

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