Using the Web for Live Interactive Music. Young, J. P. In pages 4, 2001. International Computer Music Association.
Using the Web for Live Interactive Music [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
This paper describes an exploration of utilizing the World Wide Web for interactive music. The origin of this investigation was the intermedia work Telemusic #1, by Randall Packer, which combined live performers with live public participation via the Web. During the event, visitors to the site navigated through a virtual interface, and while manipulating elements, projected their actions in the form of triggered sounds into the physical space. Simultaneously, the live audio performance was streamed back out to the Internet participants. Thus, anyone could take part in the collective realization of the work and hear the musical results in real time. The underlying technology is, to my knowledge, the first standards-based implementation linking the Web with Cycling ‘74’s MAX. Using only ECMAScript/JavaScript, Java, and the OTUDP external from UC Berkeley CNMAT, virtually any conceivable interaction with a Web page can send data to a MAX patch for processing. The code can also be readily adapted to work with Pd, jMAX, and other network-enabled applications.
@inproceedings{young_using_2001,
	title = {Using the {Web} for {Live} {Interactive} {Music}},
	url = {http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.bbp2372.2001.062},
	abstract = {This paper describes an exploration of utilizing the World Wide Web for interactive music. The origin of this investigation was the intermedia work Telemusic \#1, by Randall Packer, which combined live performers with live public participation via the Web. During the event, visitors to the site navigated through a virtual interface, and while manipulating elements, projected their actions in the form of triggered sounds into the physical space. Simultaneously, the live audio performance was streamed back out to the Internet participants. Thus, anyone could take part in the collective realization of the work and hear the musical results in real time. The underlying technology is, to my knowledge, the first standards-based implementation linking the Web with Cycling ‘74’s MAX. Using only ECMAScript/JavaScript, Java, and the OTUDP external from UC Berkeley CNMAT, virtually any conceivable interaction with a Web page can send data to a MAX patch for processing. The code can also be readily adapted to work with Pd, jMAX, and other network-enabled applications.},
	publisher = {International Computer Music Association},
	author = {Young, John P.},
	year = {2001},
	keywords = {New music composition},
	pages = {4},
}

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