Optical vortices generated by edge dislocations in electro-convective instability arrays of nematic liquid crystals. Yunda, J., Zappone, B., Domenico, A., Luca, A., & Infusino, M. Optics Letters, 43(9):1947-1949, OSA - The Optical Society, 2018. cited By 0
Optical vortices generated by edge dislocations in electro-convective instability arrays of nematic liquid crystals [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
We demonstrated by means of interferometry that optical vortices can be generated by diffraction of a laser beam from a birefringent nematic liquid crystal that spontaneously creates a periodic array of electro-convective domains and edge dislocations under an applied electric field. The diffracted beam of order m produced by an elementary dislocation comprises a number jmj of distinct optical vortices, each with unit topological charge. Birefringent liquid crystal arrays provide a fast, convenient, and promising way of generating and studying optical vortices. The used materials are inexpensive, fabrication processes are simple, and both input polarization and applied field can be used as external controls to switch the optical vortices on and off. © 2018 Optical Society of America.
@ARTICLE{Yunda20181947,
author={Yunda, J.P. and Zappone, B. and Domenico, A.L.J. and Luca, A.D.E. and Infusino, M.},
title={Optical vortices generated by edge dislocations in electro-convective instability arrays of nematic liquid crystals},
journal={Optics Letters},
year={2018},
volume={43},
number={9},
pages={1947-1949},
doi={10.1364/OL.43.001947},
note={cited By 0},
url={https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85046641812&doi=10.1364%2fOL.43.001947&partnerID=40&md5=d73eafd69f84053280a9bda1b5010a10},
abstract={We demonstrated by means of interferometry that optical vortices can be generated by diffraction of a laser beam from a birefringent nematic liquid crystal that spontaneously creates a periodic array of electro-convective domains and edge dislocations under an applied electric field. The diffracted beam of order m produced by an elementary dislocation comprises a number jmj of distinct optical vortices, each with unit topological charge. Birefringent liquid crystal arrays provide a fast, convenient, and promising way of generating and studying optical vortices. The used materials are inexpensive, fabrication processes are simple, and both input polarization and applied field can be used as external controls to switch the optical vortices on and off. © 2018 Optical Society of America.},
publisher={OSA - The Optical Society},
issn={01469592},
coden={OPLED},
pubmed_id={29714768},
document_type={Article},
source={Scopus},
}
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